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Old 05-02-2008, 06:47 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
I've read this over and over. Do you and Jeekinz have any tips on how to braise properly?
This is a really simple explanation here, but it gives you the basic idea. You control the final outcome of the dish depending on what you add, beit the stock, herbs, aromatics, etc.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:40 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
I've read this over and over. Do you and Jeekinz have any tips on how to braise properly?
My DO came with a few recipes, but there's like 500 ingredients for each one.

For example: Last night, I seared some chicken leg/thigh quarters in a saute pan and rendered out most of the fat from the skin. Turned them once and continued to cook until slightly brown on the bottom. Removed them to a bowl, and removed about 95% of the fat. Sauteed some thick sliced onion, and deglazed with about a cup of white wine. Added garlic, thyme & rosemary sprigs, bay leaf, a can of whole tomatoes that I sliced in the pan, some tomato paste, chopped roasted red pepper, frozen artichokes. Mainly just ingredients I had laying around. Put the chicken back in kind of burying them in the sauce. Lid on, and simmer until done. I remove the chicken and reduce the sauce checking for seasoning and removing leftover herb pieces. I serve it over white rice.

No muss, no fuss. You would have to try real hard to screw that up. And theres a huge window for the meat to be done, so you don't have to worry about over/under cooking.

Just think bold flavors, low and slow. Watch for too much salt too early if you reduce your liquid to a sauce. Been there, done that.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:47 AM   #23
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.... Watch for too much salt too early if you reduce your liquid to a sauce. Been there, done that.
What a great tip.
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Old 05-02-2008, 02:33 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by ironchef View Post
This is a really simple explanation here, but it gives you the basic idea. You control the final outcome of the dish depending on what you add, beit the stock, herbs, aromatics, etc.
Thanks, IC. This helped. My first real successes with meat were through braising in a slow cooker, but I have yet to manage a good result braising on the stove or in the oven. Also, you crystallized the vague idea in my head that my seasonings and braising liquids and vegetables have the greatest impact on the results. So I'm going to focus on that, since I haven't ventured much past onions, salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce. But do you have any pointers on braising in the oven vs the cook top? Also, covered or open? How do you decide which?
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Old 05-02-2008, 02:35 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
My DO came with a few recipes, but there's like 500 ingredients for each one.

For example: Last night, I seared some chicken leg/thigh quarters in a saute pan and rendered out most of the fat from the skin. Turned them once and continued to cook until slightly brown on the bottom. Removed them to a bowl, and removed about 95% of the fat. Sauteed some thick sliced onion, and deglazed with about a cup of white wine. Added garlic, thyme & rosemary sprigs, bay leaf, a can of whole tomatoes that I sliced in the pan, some tomato paste, chopped roasted red pepper, frozen artichokes. Mainly just ingredients I had laying around. Put the chicken back in kind of burying them in the sauce. Lid on, and simmer until done. I remove the chicken and reduce the sauce checking for seasoning and removing leftover herb pieces. I serve it over white rice.

No muss, no fuss. You would have to try real hard to screw that up. And theres a huge window for the meat to be done, so you don't have to worry about over/under cooking.

Just think bold flavors, low and slow. Watch for too much salt too early if you reduce your liquid to a sauce. Been there, done that.
Yep, I did use too much salt once and as a result, I'm pretty sure I undersalt now. Does it taste the same if you wait to add the salt until the braising is done?
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Old 05-02-2008, 03:39 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
Thanks, IC. This helped. My first real successes with meat were through braising in a slow cooker, but I have yet to manage a good result braising on the stove or in the oven. Also, you crystallized the vague idea in my head that my seasonings and braising liquids and vegetables have the greatest impact on the results. So I'm going to focus on that, since I haven't ventured much past onions, salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce. But do you have any pointers on braising in the oven vs the cook top? Also, covered or open? How do you decide which?
I prefer to braise on the stovetop, because it's easier to check and you don't have to worry about the oven temperature dropping everytime you open the door to check. I like to cut a piece of parchment paper that fits the size of the pan, then lay that on top of the liquid as opposed to leaving the cover ajar.

There are so many different combinations: beef vs. chicken stock, red vs. white wine, wine vs. port, tomato vs. no tomato, etc. Easiest thing is to search online for different recipes and use those as referrence.
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Old 05-02-2008, 04:24 PM   #27
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Thanks again, IC. When you say parchment paper, do you mean instead of a lid or under a lid?

I forgot, yes I usually add red wine when braising a roast. But I have never actually made stock before. I've saved up a bunch of bones in the freezer so I'm going to try that next. I didn't think about using it as the braising liquid but it sounds like it would be great. I'll let you know how I do.
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Old 05-02-2008, 04:29 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
Thanks again, IC. When you say parchment paper, do you mean instead of a lid or under a lid?

I forgot, yes I usually add red wine when braising a roast. But I have never actually made stock before. I've saved up a bunch of bones in the freezer so I'm going to try that next. I didn't think about using it as the braising liquid but it sounds like it would be great. I'll let you know how I do.
Parchment paper = no lid. Just lay it over everything and lightly simmer the braise.

A good stock will elevate a braise from good to great. A braised dish in mostly any great restaurant will have utilize a great stock as part of the braising liquid.
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:23 PM   #29
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This is great thread, lots of good ideas. Thanks everyone.

-Josh hart
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Old 05-06-2008, 09:31 AM   #30
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Making your own pasta is probably one of the most rewarding activities.
It is not only extremely inexpensive, but also the best way to enjoy sauces because the fresh past will absorb juices as opposed of dry pasta purchased at the store.
Refrigerated pasta purchased at the store is OK, but still no match to homemade...specially if you are making fetuccini Alfredo.
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