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Old 03-03-2007, 07:14 PM   #1
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Tenderizing and Velveting Meat for Stir Fry

Last night, I read a thread about velveting meat. I followed a link to cyberspace where it described the process and what it's used for. I also read about using baking soda mixed with water as a tenderizing agent. This made sense to me as the body really starts digesting foods in the intestine, after a strong alkalye is secreted from the bile ducts.

To make a long story short, I cut chuck roast against the graing into thin strips and placed in a water/baking soda brine. I let it soak for about two hours. While it was soaking, I prepared veggies for a stir-fry and cooked some brown rice.

I cooked the veggies first in my wok, and then drained, and rinsed the meat. Then, I dusted it with cornstarch. I didn't make the egg-wash part as I was in a hurry. I added the meat to the hot wok with just a scant 8th cup of water (thre tbs.). I moved the meat constantly and let the cornstarch thicken evenly all over it. I then seasoned it and added the veggies. I seasoned again with soy sauce.

It's a winning technique. The meat was silky smooth and very tender. It's the most tender chuck meat I've ever cooked! And yet, it isn't mushy. There is no baking powder after taste either. I recommend this technique to anyone who loves to stir fry with meat. I will next try it with chicken, and then with pork. I see great things in store for this technique.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

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Old 03-03-2007, 07:25 PM   #2
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Sounds great. I'm never sure of the difference between baking powder, baking soda and bicarbonate of soda. I'm sure there's a thread with this somewhere. I'll search for it and definitely do this, Goodweed. Thanks.
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Old 03-03-2007, 07:25 PM   #3
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What was the soda to water ratio for the soaking medium? And how much meat (weight) did you soak? Sounds like you have a winner.
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Old 03-03-2007, 07:34 PM   #4
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Wow! Someone would have to ask for measurments. That's one of my downfalls. I just seem to know about how much to pour into something. If I had to give an educated guess, I'd have to say that I used about 3 tbs. of baking soda (same thing as bicarbonate of soda) to about 2 cups of water. I used about 3/4 lb. of beef strips, cut very thin.

Good luck with those measurements. But they should work well.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-03-2007, 07:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
That's one of my downfalls. I just seem to know about how much to pour into something. Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
What wouldn't I give for a downfall like that! Thanks for the comment on baking soda and bicarb of soda, by the way.
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Old 03-03-2007, 08:17 PM   #6
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Snoop baking soda and bicarbonate of soda are the same,.

Baking powder is baking soda with an acid added.

Just Google or search DC and you will learn about the intricacies of baking powder.
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Old 03-03-2007, 09:56 PM   #7
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Very interesting! I am the #1 fan of brining! Do you think this is better than a typical brine using regular salt?
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Old 03-03-2007, 10:46 PM   #8
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Not better, but it's used for a different purpose. Brining with baking soda is used to tenderize. Brining with salt enhances moisture and flavor.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-04-2007, 07:30 AM   #9
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thank you! I will definiteley be trying this soon
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Old 03-04-2007, 08:10 AM   #10
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One word of caution, you must rinse the meat after brining it to remove as much of the baking powder as possible. It does have a flavor, and will affect the other flavors in whatever the meat is added to if you're not careful. Also, it doesn't seem to tenderize connecting tissue, so remove as much fat and connecting tissue as possible.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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