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Old 06-24-2007, 03:22 PM   #1
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Tenderizing Meat

Hi

I was wondering, if you brine the meat, do you have to tenderize the meat ?

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Old 06-24-2007, 03:31 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by battleangela
Hi

I was wondering, if you brine the meat, do you have to tenderize the meat ?
i've never tenderized meat before brining
and depending on the brine it could actually tenderize the meat also
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Old 06-24-2007, 04:31 PM   #3
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Brining meat does not require you to tenderize it. If the meat is tender when you buy it, it will still be tender after brining. If the meat is tough when you buy it, it will still be tough after you brine it.

Acidic marinades on their own do not tenderize either.

A dairy-based marinade such as one with buttermilk or yogurt will tenderize as will certain enzymes present in papaya and pineapple. This enzyme is available in a product called Adolph's Meat Tenderizer.

You can also tenderize meat mechanically. There are a couple of tools you can use. A two-sided meat mallet will have one surface with pyramid shaped points that you can use to pound the meat to tenderize. Also available is a jacarding tool. It's a device made that has a number of sharp metal pins that you use to repeatedly jab the meat with to break up the tough muscle fibers.
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Old 06-25-2007, 12:30 PM   #4
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Also, brining is not appropriate for beef -- just poultry, pork and shrimp.
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Old 06-25-2007, 06:06 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Also, brining is not appropriate for beef -- just poultry, pork and shrimp.
how is brining not appropriate for beef?
how do you think corned beef, pastrami and montreal smoked meat came about
all three are brined
brining is also a way to preserve food and anything can be brined
some smokers brine their salmon before smoking so that is another
i brine some veggies before grilling such as asparagus, broccoli, salsify, parsnips,carrots, cauliflower, anything dense that might burn otherwise when grilled
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Old 06-25-2007, 10:31 PM   #6
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Pastrami and corned beef are salt cured in a solution that is much saltier than the brine customarily used to add moisture to lean cuts such as poultry, pork and some seafood. One is a preservation process while the other is a means to add moisture and often flavors to an item.

As beef typically contains intramuscular fat, there is no need to brine it as you do poultry or pork.
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Old 06-26-2007, 06:48 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Pastrami and corned beef are salt cured in a solution that is much saltier than the brine customarily used to add moisture to lean cuts such as poultry, pork and some seafood. One is a preservation process while the other is a means to add moisture and often flavors to an item.

As beef typically contains intramuscular fat, there is no need to brine it as you do poultry or pork.
you do make a point but when i make pastrami for the restaurant i use a saturation brine
a brine with more salt and sugar than the water can absorb and i do had pickling spice to flavour
points of technicality i suppose
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