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Old 01-15-2012, 04:48 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Yes, if you have a whole tenderloin, those odds and ends are what to use for a strognoff. Greg was buying meat to make the dish for one person so a FM is how you have to go. I haven't seen tenderloin scraps in the supermarket.
Same here. What a shame.
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:22 PM   #22
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If I need thin slices I go to either a Korean or Japanese market. They always have sliced, packaged beef slices ready for use in their typical dishes. They're usually premium cuts, marbled like crazy, and priced at least $29/lb and up. They are beautiful to look at.
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Old 01-16-2012, 12:07 AM   #23
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If I need thin slices I go to either a Korean or Japanese market. They always have sliced, packaged beef slices ready for use in their typical dishes. They're usually premium cuts, marbled like crazy, and priced at least $29/lb and up. They are beautiful to look at.
I'm so jealous!
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Old 01-16-2012, 09:28 AM   #24
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In Asian recipes, in addition to using corn starch and soy sauce for marinade, another way to keep beef tender is to add a few drops of water and/or oil to the meat during marinade. Mix and blend the liquid well with meat. Leave for 20 minutes, or until the liquid is completely absorbed by meat. Then add a few more drops; again mix well to help absorbing. Repeat this practice for a few times, beef would absorb lots of liquid and stay very tender. Then you can make a quick stir-fry with the beef and some vegetables, the beef will be very tender and juicy.
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Old 01-16-2012, 11:12 AM   #25
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If I need thin slices I go to either a Korean or Japanese market. They always have sliced, packaged beef slices ready for use in their typical dishes. They're usually premium cuts, marbled like crazy, and priced at least $29/lb and up. They are beautiful to look at.
$29 per/pound!

Wow! That's almost as bad as sushi.
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:22 PM   #26
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For thin slice meat I go to one of several Mexican meat markets or Super Mercados in our area. Good for philly steak sandwiches and fajitas. For Braciole, I use round steak and pound it thin with the smooth side of a meat pounder and don't make any holes in the meat. I think in addition to getting it to the desired thinness, it breaks down the tissue and after a long slow simmer, it's pretty tenderized.

The other day I made thin sliced top sirloin marinated for at least 8 hours, ( it needn't be that long) in a soy sauce/ rice wine vinegar and more. It was very tender when stir fried. More tender than the other half I pan seared in a cast iron pan as a solid piece of medium rare steak.
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Old 01-19-2012, 12:39 PM   #27
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$29 per/pound!

Wow! That's almost as bad as sushi.
They are packaged in small portions, 1/2 lb or less, so they don't seem quite that expensive.
They're generally used for Korean BBQ, shabu-shabu, sukiyaki, etc.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:00 PM   #28
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Lean & Tender! Flank, top round, filet Mignon, skirt steak, silicon, Kobe...All good choices. To slice thin put meat in freezer until very firm (but not frozen), slicing thin pieces is so much easier. Never be afraid to use an expensive of meat in a stir fry, each meal deserves to be the best it can.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:45 PM   #29
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In spite of the praise of thin slices of meat IMO thin meat slices are not appropriate to most stir fry recipes, and I'm using Asian cooking as my yardstick. Yes of course there are exceptions, but the majority of stir fried dishes you'll encounter at Chinese, Japanese and Thai restaurants are bite sized pieces but not thinly sliced.

I would recommend thin slices only (1) if the meat is too tough if it isn't sliced thinly, or (2) the recipe you're following specifically calls for thinly sliced meat. Of course if you're inventing your own recipe or prefer to deviate from the recipe you're following then that's your choice.
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