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Old 08-05-2008, 06:47 PM   #11
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Actually, cut potatoes in water for 20-30 minutes improves the frying by removing some of the surface starch.

kitchenelf is right about moisture and frying. The potatoes MUST be completely dried off before frying.
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Old 08-05-2008, 07:20 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Actually, cut potatoes in water for 20-30 minutes improves the frying by removing some of the surface starch.

kitchenelf is right about moisture and frying. The potatoes MUST be completely dried off before frying.
I don't ever fry potatoes anymore, myself, but when soaking (then drying well) and roasting, they stay so moist inside and brown so beautifully on the outside; I do this with Yukons or red potatoes.
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Old 08-05-2008, 07:21 PM   #13
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And how long would I leave the meat in the brine?
It depends on the size of the meat. Chicken breasts I do for 2 hours, no longer than 3. A whole chicken I do for 5-6 hours.
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Old 09-12-2008, 02:02 AM   #14
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I brine chicken breasts in 1 qt water, 1/4 C Kosher salt and 1 Tbsp Brown sugar. Put in baggie and refrigerate. NOT for more than 1 hour! Great grilled or broiled.

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Old 09-12-2008, 08:59 AM   #15
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I'm with Kitchenelf. I add all sorts of flavorings to my brine, especially chicken. I usually brine and grill 10 lbs of chicken leg-and-thigh quarters at a time. I use 3 qt of water, 3/8 c salt, 3/8 c brown sugar, rosemary, thyme, sage, and garlic. But, I take 1 pint of the water, add the flavorings, bring it to a boil, then let it sit for a little while to steep and infuse the flavors. I'll add some ice and cold water to bring the brine to the volume I need, while chilling it so that I'm not storing chicken in a warm brine. I'll add the brine and the chicken to a non-reactive pan, and place it all in the refrigerator. 3 - 4 hours later, I fire up my grill and cook the chicken over medium-low coals for about 30 minutes. MMMMMMMMM!!!!!!! My family can't get enough of it!
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Old 11-11-2008, 06:28 PM   #16
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I never remember to brine before cooking! I forgot again today. Esp. with me having the day off, I would have brined my chicken breasts for a few hours before slow-roasting them for BBQ.

Oh well. At least the slow, low roasting usually keeps enough moisture in anyway.
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Old 11-11-2008, 06:49 PM   #17
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Brining is a great technique to ensure juicy poultry.

I always brine my turkey. I did a test run of a dry brined turkey this weekend. Ala the Zuni Cafe chicken.

It was good, but a bit messy. I think I'll stick to wet brine.

And Ekim, low and slow is a cooking technique for meats that are tough or have a lot of fat or connective tissue. Meats that are very lean and tender like chicken breasts are not very good candidates for low, slow cooking. They dry out that way. Chicken breasts, pork tenderloin, filet of beef, etc. do much better when they are cooked quickly with higher heat.
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