"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-17-2007, 06:33 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 285
Top sirloin roast?

While I often use this cut for steaks (grilled, panfried, whatever)...I figured I'd consult you guys before screwing up a perfectly good roast. It's labelled as being a "Top Sirloin Premium Oven Roast" and is about 3.5 lbs. I've found several threads referring to sirloin tip roasts being less fatty, and I know top sirloin isn't AS fatty either, but wasn't sure on the preferred method of roasting one.

My original plan was just to make a rub for it, sear it, and then dry roast it on a "rack" of carrots, celery, onions, and garlic and make a gravy out of the fond. (I got a new Calphalon Commercial "everyday pan" that I'm eager to try )

Other suggestions? I've never done an actual pot roast before, but that'd be an option if it'd make for a much better dining experience.

__________________

__________________
Silver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2007, 06:40 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,358
I would do this as an oven roast, not a pot roast. For a pot roast, I like a boneless chuck roast.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2007, 06:40 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
I think you've got it...might add a wee bit of water/beef broth...No more than med rare...

Call me when supper is ready!!!
__________________
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2007, 06:55 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 285
Awesome, I just got a little worried when reading the sirloin tip roast threads.

I will ignore those and proceed as planned. Thanks guys!
__________________
Silver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2007, 10:30 PM   #5
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
Somewhere here--or maybe somewhere else--I have posted about this roast. It will be absolutely delicious, and I have NEVER seen it sold as a roast of that size--you are lucky. This is the roast I served at our family Early Christmas dinner. I got mine at costco--14# whole roast, primal cut. It served our 30, and probably would have gone to 40.
I have in the distant past served sirloin tip, which you must be judicious about cutting across the grain like London Broil to get tender slices. The top sirloin is just that--a boneless sirloin steak ROAST, and you can cut it like a tender roast--straight down cuts.
Be sure to use an instant read thermometer so you don't overcook.
It is DEEElicious. ENJOY.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2007, 03:36 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 285
Roast came out pretty well, thanks for your tips, guys. It was much closer to medium than the medium rare that I was going for. I took it out at 135 and put it on the cutting board and covered it in foil. I think the foil was what kept it cooking for as long as it did so it ended up at 150 instead of the 145 I was hoping for...but that shouldn't be a huge difference. The centre of the roast was more or less MR and it got progressively more cooked outwards from there, which is to be expected, I guess.

I seared the roast in olive oil and onions over medium-high for about a minute or two on each side, then moved the roast out of the pan for a minute to set up the rest of the roast-brigade. This consisted of a "rack" of celery and carrots with more onions and garlic in the pan. I also threw in halved red nugget potatoes all around and let them roast with the meat (drizzled with EVOO and salt and pepper). I also dumped about 1 cup of water into the base of the pan, which in retrospect may have been a bit too much, but everything came out great, so I can't complain. There was just a lot more water left at the end than I expected there to be.

I then roasted the whole thing for about 1.5 hours (longer than I thought it would take) at 350-375 (I turned it up a bit when it was taking REALLY long). I made gravy from the leftover water and fond and it was pretty good. All in all, I'm pretty happy.

One question, though...

The "bottom" of the roast had a relatively thick layer of fat on it. I roasted with that side down - should I have trimmed it off or maybe roasted with that side up so the fat could ooze down into the meat for flavouring?

Thanks!

Mike
__________________
Silver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2007, 06:12 AM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
I roast (always and any and all cuts of meat) with the fat cap up--it bastes the roast with the rendered fat and cooks it to a nice tasty crispness. I also liberally salt and pepper this fat cap.
The finishing temp I cook a tender piece of meat to is 125* and then tent it to rest. This always delivers a nice rare to medium rare piece in the middle and slightly more done toward the end, as you describe, for those that like it that way.
This IS a tender tender cut of meat--it is what you get for a boneless sirloin steak so it is delicious, but also shouldn't be overcooked (for our eaters! ;o) )
For the larger piece I described it isn't necessary to sear first--I start it at 500* for 15 minutes and then turn down to 350*. For your smaller piece, this was probably a good idea to sear. I am a bit surprised that it took that long to cook for that small roast--was your oven pre-heated?
And finally, I would not add any water at all to your pan for roasting this tender cut. It creates steam and a different roasting environment. It may have even contributed to the longer cooking time.
But a good piece of meat is hard to beat!!
An aside--a sirloin tip roast is a VERY flavorful piece of meat also--just different in how you must carve it. It needs to be carved in thin slices across the grain of the meat to be "tender"--it will not be as tender as this roast but still very very good. It also takes longer to roast because it isn't as tender a piece of meat, but it definitely is a candidate for roasting and not pot roast.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2007, 12:08 PM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Posts: 285
Interesting Cando...good info to know.

Oven was pre-heated, but I also thought the water may have been part of what slowed it down, as well as the meat wasn't fully at room temp (I forgot to pull it out of the fridge as early as I planned) - which could also explain a bit of overcooking on the outside and only just right in the middle.

I'll try again soon and hopefully it'll come out even better!
__________________
Silver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2008, 11:16 PM   #9
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Whitby, Ontario
Posts: 1
does a top sirloin roast need to be cut with the grain or against the grain? i'm cooking my first one tomorrow and am getting way too many opposing directions!

this roast is huge...1.935kg/4.25lbs...triple Grade A. I've never cooked a roast at all before so it should be interesting...

tips for beginners would be great ... anyone?
__________________
The Hazel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2008, 02:48 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
ironchef's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The SPAM eating capital of the world.
Posts: 3,558
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hazel View Post
does a top sirloin roast need to be cut with the grain or against the grain? i'm cooking my first one tomorrow and am getting way too many opposing directions!

this roast is huge...1.935kg/4.25lbs...triple Grade A. I've never cooked a roast at all before so it should be interesting...

tips for beginners would be great ... anyone?
As a general rule, most, if not all beef should be sliced against the grain. This is especially important for the cut of beef that you will be cooking.
__________________

__________________
"Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
ironchef is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.