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Old 10-07-2007, 10:10 PM   #21
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Are you guys seriously telling me you donít know how to pour large quantities of a liquid mass into another vessel? Really, are you saying that with all of your knowledge you donít know how to simply adjust and pour a soup or stew? This CANíT be a new technology as I have been doing it for years, and Iíve see you guys do things far more advanced than me. What gives?
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:14 PM   #22
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No, What we are saying is that it's not the best solution for the OP.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:22 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW View Post
Okay - let's go back and look at what Mike, the OP, said:



Pouring a big ol' pot-o-stuff into something smaller is an aquired skill. And, it will be learned in time keltin ... but isn't it better for someone to learn in steps rather than jumping right in over their head and pouring a big pot of hot soup all over themselves???
I kind of see your point. But eventually, it needs to be learned. Why learn the wrong or slow way up front. My karate instructor would never allow us to learn the wrong or easy way even if it meant a few extra weeks of teaching. The thing about learning something is that, once you are comfortable you're liable to slip into a comfort zone and not move to the next level.

Either way, Iíd much rather pour a pot in 8 seconds than sit there and ladle it for over a minute.

What about the rest that want to learn about blackening chicken or fish? Or others that want to learn about perfect steaks? Should we tell them that it is dangerous to heat cat iron to those temps for blackening? Or that beef is unsafe at medium rare? What about a flambťí dish.Öthe dangers of setting that alcohol on fire are considerable.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:25 PM   #24
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Either way, the OP said:

I'm pretty new at cooking, and wondering what's the best way to transfer a sauce pan full of soup into a blender

And without a doubt good pouring techniques for a small batch as described is THE best way to go. A ladle will take twice as long and will end up with you having to pour anyway. So why not learn to pour up front?
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:27 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
I kind of see your point. But eventually, it needs to be learned.
WHY??? Pouring a large pot into another pot is not an essential kitchen skill. It is not the only way to get the contents of a pot into another vessel. It is not the safest way either. I would rather take a minute and take my time then take 8 seconds and potentially spill boiling hot liquid all over the place and myself or others.

Now if I were cooking in a professional kitchen then maybe those extra 52 seconds that I saved might be worth something, but in my home kitchen the safest way is the way I will choose.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:28 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
WHY??? Pouring a large pot into another pot is not an essential kitchen skill. It is not the only way to get the contents of a pot into another vessel. It is not the safest way either. I would rather take a minute and take my time then take 8 seconds and potentially spill boiling hot liquid all over the place and myself or others.

Now if I were cooking in a professional kitchen then maybe those extra 52 seconds that I saved might be worth something, but in my home kitchen the safest way is the way I will choose.
If you ladle the sauce out of the pan to another vessel, can you get it all?

Or, do you eventually need to pour it?

Or throw it away?
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:30 PM   #27
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And without a doubt good pouring techniques for a small batch as described is THE best way to go.
I completely disagree.
Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin View Post
A ladle will take twice as long and will end up with you having to pour anyway. So why not learn to pour up front?
If you have good ladle skills then you will not need to pour anything. Sure there might be a little dribble left over, but we are taking a tablespoon or so. Is that really worth possibly spilling hot liquid all over the place? For me the answer is a resounding NO.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:31 PM   #28
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And seriously, you guys are acting like this is a hard skill to learn. What gives. I thought everyone knew how to do this????
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:33 PM   #29
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If its a small container use a ladle if its a large container it might help if someone could tilt it a bit and pour it down the side.If no help just use a small or medium sauce pan rather then a ladle and pour as close to the bottom of container as possible slowly.I dont know what the big deal is, just get it done.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:34 PM   #30
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And seriously, you guys are acting like this is a hard skill to learn. What gives. I thought everyone knew how to do this????
No one said it is a hard skill to learn. We simply said it is not the best option. Why do you need to be so fast in your kitchen? There are two options on the table. One is a little slower (we are taking seconds here, not hours) and much safer. The other is quicker, with the potential for serious injury if you slip or your dog dog runs into you or the container you are pouring into knocks over or any number of other things happen.
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