"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-04-2016, 12:58 PM   #21
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 27
Thanks! Will try the paper towel next time.
__________________

__________________
Mike Earls
AF5MS
TSRA Life Member
NRA Benefactor Member
Mike1951 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 01:45 PM   #22
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,796
Since the tuna I buy is packed in olive oil, what doesn't drain fits right in with the mayo I use.
__________________

__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 03:46 PM   #23
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,331
I buy tuna in oil, too. I like to add chopped celery to tuna salad and yes, the next day (if it lasts to the next day), the celery has given up some water. I just drain it off.

I notice the same thing with potato salad after a couple of days, when it's made with celery.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 04:33 PM   #24
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
I buy tuna in oil, too. I like to add chopped celery to tuna salad and yes, the next day (if it lasts to the next day), the celery has given up some water. I just drain it off.

I notice the same thing with potato salad after a couple of days, when it's made with celery.
With regard to celery, onion, peppers, etc., could the moisture be pressed out prior to assembly?

Some other method?
__________________
Mike Earls
AF5MS
TSRA Life Member
NRA Benefactor Member
Mike1951 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 04:57 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,923
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1951 View Post
With regard to celery, onion, peppers, etc., could the moisture be pressed out prior to assembly?

Some other method?
No, you can't really press out the liquid. Salting vegetables causes them to release water, so you could do that. Salting will also cause them to soften, though, so they won't be as crunchy.

I think it's easier to drain it off as needed.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 05:02 PM   #26
Master Chef
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 6,331
I agree with GG, Mike...if you like the added crunchies of the veggies, your best bet is to just drain the excess liquid out the next day. Or just make enough to use it up in one day.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 06:03 PM   #27
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 8,294
When we have "watery" leftovers like tuna salad or potato salad, I just mix things up again to incorporate that moisture right back into the food. Same thing goes with the whey that rises to the top in yogurt, sour cream, or cottage cheese.

I learned a trick with dairy products like yogurt, etc. ages ago. After you take out your serving, use the back of the spoon to smooth out the surface of the food and make it flat. It seems that those foods stay fresher for longer.
__________________
... nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have... ~~~ LeBron James
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2016, 06:56 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,009
I've read that adding a tablespoon of commercial dry breadcrumbs to each 6 ounce can of tuna helps eliminate the liquid, never tried it.

You could also try using powdered onion and celery salt but I prefer the crunch of real vegetables.

I just press the leftover tuna on the side of the bowl with a slotted spoon and call it good enough!

Good luck!
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 11:53 AM   #29
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,845
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Since the tuna I buy is packed in olive oil, what doesn't drain fits right in with the mayo I use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
I buy tuna in oil, too. I like to add chopped celery to tuna salad and yes, the next day (if it lasts to the next day), the celery has given up some water. I just drain it off.

I notice the same thing with potato salad after a couple of days, when it's made with celery.
I should have been more clear. I use this method with canned tuna in water or in oil.
Like said above, the liquid must be coming from the chopped veggies.
Not to much you can do about that.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2016, 03:32 PM   #30
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Calosso, Piemonte
Posts: 312
I learned how to make tuna salad the Italian way over 40 years ago: here's the recipe:

1 can tuna in olive oil
1 can borlotti beans
1 red bell pepper cut into small squares
1 red onion that will fit in the palm of your hand, finely chopped
1 handful fresh hulled corn cooked
Juice of just over half a fresh lemon
Black olives to taste (optional)
4 anchovy fillets (optional)
chopped and cooked green beans 1 handful (optional)
Salt and pepper.

Put the tuna and the oil in came in into a salad bowl. Flake the tuna. Add the other ingredients in no particular order except for the salt and pepper which you do last when you adjust the flavours for seasoning before serving. This recipe solves the problem of getting rid of the brine it's canned in in the other way of canning tuna!

di reston


Enough ios never as good as a feast Oscar Wilde
__________________

__________________
di reston is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.