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Old 05-18-2005, 11:31 AM   #11
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The only thing I can think of that is not stainless and that could hold my boards (I think) is my roasting pan which is non stick. Would that work or would it ruin my roasting pan?
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Old 05-18-2005, 11:32 AM   #12
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I keep a bleach solution in a spray bottle. I use it to spray the counter and sink after processing raw poultry.

I use it to de-stain my plastic cutting boards. It sanitizes them as well. I also use the sanitizing cycle on the dishwasher for that.

I wash all dish cloths, towels and cutting board pads in a separate load with a heavy dose of bleach. I let it soak for an hour then finish the wash with a double rinse.

It also purifies the water in your swimming pool.

BTW, setting aside the specialty bealches for a moment, all bleach is the same. If you buy Clorox over the store brand, you're paying extra for the label.

In addition to making pretty little white stains on your colored clothing if you spill it, It will eat the fibers in the fabric and cause holes. It's potent stuff!



Never mix it with ammonia!
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Old 05-18-2005, 11:40 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronjohn55
A note on cleaning with bleach - it's great for many things, but keep it away from all things stainless steel. Over time, aka prolonged contact, it will cause pitting and corrosion (not good for those of us with SS sinks....). A quick wipe and rinse is no problem, though...

John
Bleach is an oxidizing agent. It will accelerate rusting in rust prone metals. However, for bleaching my cutting boards, I use a diluted solution in my SS sink. Never had a problem.

I don't fill the sink with bleach and water. I layer my cutting boards in the sink with 2-3 layers of papertowel in between boards and on the top board. I soak each paper towel with a 50/50 bleach solution and leave it for an hour or so.

The papertowels hold the bleach on the board surface and delays their drying out and allows me to bleach both sides of the boards at the same time. At the end of that time, the papertowels have disintegrated and I wash them down the drain.
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Old 05-18-2005, 12:13 PM   #14
 
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If you use hummingbird feeders they should be cleaned (soaked) with a weak bleach water solution, then rinsed well before refilling.
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Old 05-18-2005, 12:43 PM   #15
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If you have a thermal coffee jug(I know there's another name for these but I can't think of it), pour about 2 or 3 Tbsp. bleach into it & fill with hot water & let it soak. Dump the bleach water & wash with hot soapy water. It will remove any coffee residue in the jug.
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Old 05-18-2005, 12:52 PM   #16
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crewsk
If you have a thermal coffee jug(I know there's another name for these but I can't think of it), pour about 2 or 3 Tbsp. bleach into it & fill with hot water & let it soak. Dump the bleach water & wash with hot soapy water. It will remove any coffee residue in the jug.
If there really is an issue with bleach and stainless steel, that may not be such a good idea especially if the carafe is stainless. I use baking soda to clean mine.
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Old 05-18-2005, 12:54 PM   #17
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HanArt, the inside of all mine are glass.
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Old 05-18-2005, 01:15 PM   #18
 
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HanArt, the inside of all mine are glass.
Then you're cool.
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Old 05-18-2005, 03:28 PM   #19
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crewsk - is Thermos the word you're looking for?
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Old 05-18-2005, 03:41 PM   #20
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Hi All,


Andy's post got me to thinking - when homebrewers (of which I'm a guilty party) talk of cleaning things with bleach, we're usually speaking of concentrations that are more closely aligned with a caustic cleaner than a dilute solution.

As an example, my brewing buckets and such are usually cleaned and soaked with a solution of 1 cup (or more) per gallon of water. The smell of bleach in the solution is very pronounced. This type of solution can start to react with stainless after about an hour or so of contact time (and homebrewers are notorious for letting things soak overnight...).

A more reasonable houshold type of mix wouldn't cause any damage, especially if it was a short soak followed by a rinse. After all, most municipal water at one time used chlorine (many have now switched to chloramine), and many - mine included - still do, and it has't ruined my sink.

So - short version, don't overdo it, and even your stainless should be OK. (But I'm still not putting bleach in my kegs! )

John
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