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Old 08-15-2013, 12:56 PM   #1
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Volume measuring

when you fill say a cup of sugar in a dry measuring cup,what would be the proper way to say this: 1 cup of sugar is holding 8 ounce by volume? To me 8 oz is weight and that does not seem right or even fluid oz, its not liquid. So what would the right way be?

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Old 08-15-2013, 01:05 PM   #2
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There are two kinds of ounces. Ounces of weight (avoirdupois ounces) and fluid ounces which are measures of volume. The 'fluid' part of of the name is misleading but it tells you you are measuring volumes.

Weight ounces require a scale while volume ounces call for measuring cups.

So if you fill a cup with sugar you have 8 ounces by volume of sugar.

More info. You should use individual sized measuring cups for dry items like sugar and flour. Just fill the cup and level it off with a straight edge.

Liquids are best measured in a larger glass or plastic measuring cup with markings on the side. Fill the liquid to the desired measure so the mark is just below the surface of the liquid.
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Old 08-15-2013, 01:27 PM   #3
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Weight and volume do not equal the same things as Andy already noted.

For example, one cup of unsifted all-purpose flour weighs 5 ounces. But the volume of the cup you measure it in may have an 8-ounce mark on it.

One of the best recommendations I can offer when it comes to measuring liquids or solids is to get yourself a reliable digital scale. This is one of the most helpful tools any cook can have in the kitchen.
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Old 08-15-2013, 01:34 PM   #4
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One cup of sugar averages 7 ounces by weight. That's why I just weigh, depending on the size of the granuals it could be more or less if you measure by volume. Sugar has less mass than water so water will weigh more in an 8 ounce cup than the same cup filled with sugar.

My favorite method to convert older recipes is measure how I would have by volume and weigh that. Newer recipes from cookbooks I use the 7 ounce sugar and the 5 ounce flour as standards.
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Old 08-16-2013, 01:24 AM   #5
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I don't think it matters if 8 ounces is a cup to me or you. If the recipe says 1 cup of sugar, it means one cup of sugar. If the recipes calls for 8 ounces of sugar, you should measure up 8 ounces of sugar for that recipe.
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Old 08-16-2013, 05:04 AM   #6
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could some one tell me what they mean when they say equal volume and weight you have what? reading this and then it was cut off. Would any one know what this is about? Also on a liquid measuring cup on mine has 1 cup than across from it 8oz.....what does this actually mean.Is it talking about 1 cup weighs 8oz ,(8fl.oz)? THX
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Old 08-16-2013, 07:12 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumu View Post
could some one tell me what they mean when they say equal volume and weight you have what? reading this and then it was cut off. Would any one know what this is about? Also on a liquid measuring cup on mine has 1 cup than across from it 8oz.....what does this actually mean.Is it talking about 1 cup weighs 8oz ,(8fl.oz)? THX
It means 8 FLUID ounces. It'll only be 8 ounces if you weigh fluid such as water or milk, if you weigh 1 cup of feathers it's not gonna weigh 8 ounces...
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Old 08-16-2013, 08:21 AM   #8
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Switch to metric measurements and you don't have the same confusing wording. But then again, you would have to convert volume and weight measures from the English units to metric units, and that's confusing enough as it is.

There is a reason that engineers, chemists, and scientific types use metric measurements.

Me I still use English volume and weight measurements. it's what I'm used to.

Ounces - a measure of weight where 16 ounces = 1 lb., 2000 lbs. = 1 ton

Fluid ounce - 8 fluid ounces = 1 cup, 16 fluid ounces = 1 pint, 32 fluid ounces = 1 quart, 128 fluid ounces = 1 gallon

Profesional bakers use recipes that measure by weight as there is often considerable variation in the actual amount of matter in a container. For instance, sifted flour contains much more air between particulates, than does flour that's been bounced around in the back of a truck. The jostling causes the flour particles to settle, squeezing out much of the air, and so a cup of that flour weighs more. Teh same is true of all solid material in an enclosed space. Liquids, on the other hand, then to maintain a constant weight per volume due to the nature of the liquids. However, a gallon of milk weighs less than a gallon of water, but more than a gallon of oil. Different liquids have different specific weights.

And as posted above, dry measuring cups are substantially different than are measuring cups designed for fluid measurements.

Hope that helps.

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Old 08-16-2013, 09:16 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumu View Post
could some one tell me what they mean when they say equal volume and weight you have what? reading this and then it was cut off. Would any one know what this is about? Also on a liquid measuring cup on mine has 1 cup than across from it 8oz.....what does this actually mean.Is it talking about 1 cup weighs 8oz ,(8fl.oz)? THX
Water based liquids (milk, water, etc.) measure 8 fluid ounces and weigh about 8 ounces on a scale. But this is only true for water based liquids.
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:28 AM   #10
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I don't think it matters if 8 ounces is a cup to me or you. If the recipe says 1 cup of sugar, it means one cup of sugar. If the recipes calls for 8 ounces of sugar, you should measure up 8 ounces of sugar for that recipe.

If it says 8 ounces, you should weigh it
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