"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Terms & Techniques
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-04-2007, 03:27 PM   #31
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin View Post
[FONT=Verdana]You’re right GB, using a zip-loc bag isn’t technically sous vide, but the basic idea is there.
I disagree. I think the basic idea is not there. The main component in sous vide is two fold. One is cooking in a vacuum. You certainly do not get that from zip lock bags. The other component is a very long cook time at a low temperature. The only thing this home made method has in common is that food is cooked in a bag.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 03:30 PM   #32
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
I disagree. I think the basic idea is not there. The main component in sous vide is two fold. One is cooking in a vacuum. You certainly do not get that from zip lock bags. The other component is a very long cook time at a low temperature. The only thing this home made method has in common is that food is cooked in a bag.
So what's a good name for the Food Saver or zip-loc technique at home?
__________________

__________________
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 03:46 PM   #33
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
Boiling foods in plastic bags.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 03:47 PM   #34
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
The ziplock people tell you not to use their bags in boiling water. You need to keep the water hot enough to not kill yourself with food poisoning but low enough so that you don't eat a melted plastic bag. I am not sure what the attraction is to this "technique."

It's so easy to perfectly poach a chicken breast almost effortlessly and mindlesly using a pan and some water.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 03:48 PM   #35
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Does it really need a name?
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 04:02 PM   #36
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Actually, I was going to use a Food Saver pack that is vacuumed sealed and specified for immersion in boiling water. But, this technique wouldn’t use boiling water (212F) but would instead monitor the temp of the water and keep it at 165F.

True sous vide is typically used today for interrupted cooking where meals are prepared in this manner, then quickly frozen for use later. However, it is beginning to catch on for uninterrupted cooking in restaurants......although this method was banned last year in New York city by the NY Health Department until an appropriate food-safety plan can be devised and implemented.

As to why do it at home? It sounds fun. Also, I’m interested in the taste and texture of the final product. In April of 2006, Georges Pralus, the inventor of the sous vide technique, held a training class entitled “Des techniques de caisson sous vide” in David Bouley’s test kitchen. In that class, the appeal and benefits of sous vide cooking are described:

Sous vide is an extremely healthful method of preparing food. Most of the benefits are directly related to the fact that food is placed in a sealed, reduced oxygen environment and cooked at low temperatures. The net effect is precise control over heat, oxygen, and added water, which are the three elements most responsible for reducing the nutritional content of conventionally prepared foods.

As a flameless, low heat cooking method, little additional fat is required during cooking to prevent adhesion of proteins to cooking surfaces. Any added lipids are strictly for the enhancement of mouth feel and flavor. Because of the plastic barrier, oxidation is significantly reduced, preserving the qualities of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids2.

The plastic film also prevents the loss of moisture and flavors. Consequently, flavors are amplified, and fewer spices and less salt is required, lowering the overall sodium content of sous vide foods. Water soluble minerals are typically leached into cooking water, reducing the mineral content of foods processed by traditional means. The pouch eliminates mineral loss, preserving the mineral content of fresh foods.
__________________
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 05:00 PM   #37
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,917
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeraBlue
Have you tried quickly sauteing them, and then finishing the cooking in simmering liquid? Marsala or picatta comes to mind...and it works every time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
That's what I meant.

So what's the 'French' term for that?
Amazingly enough, it seems like pot roast to me, according to definitions I've found. From http://www.recipestogo.com/kitchart/kitchart17.html

<quote>
Pot-roast - To brown meat in a small amount of fat, then finish cooking in a small amount of liquid.
<end quote>

I've seen several sites that have the same definition, and it doesn't specify how long to cook in liquid, which makes it different from a braise.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 08:47 PM   #38
Assistant Cook
 
KellySeven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Queensland, Oz
Posts: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I am not sure what the attraction is to this "technique."

It's so easy to perfectly poach a chicken breast almost effortlessly and mindlesly using a pan and some water.
The attraction is the intense flavour and tender texture of the finished product. It's completely different from poaching where the 'insert food item here' takes on the flavour of the poaching liquid. Try it, you'll see what I mean.

Top chefs from all over the world use this technique - both the slow and fast method. A little Molecular Gastronomy for the home cook.
__________________
KellySeven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2007, 09:34 PM   #39
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 17
I aw an episode of "Chef's Story" where Thomas Keller demonstrated the Sous-vide technique. He cooked up some chicken breast (boneless), a stuffed boneless chicken thigh (rolled up and tied like a sausage, and some asparagus. After the Sous-vide, he pan fried the chicken a bit. It looked really cool and when he sliced the chicken, it looked so juicy. His set up for the demo was simply a pot of water with what looked like a candy thermometer. The one part that confused me though was that he said in the restaurant he uses a probe thermometer to tell when the meat was done, which he didn't have for the demo. How would a probe thermometer be used when the meat is vacuum sealed?? Also he didn't mention cooking times for the meat, but he did say 15 or 20 min for the asparagus.

Gotta break out the Foodsaver and give it a go!!

Michael
__________________
Mystic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2007, 11:35 AM   #40
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,280
Quote:
Originally Posted by KellySeven View Post
The attraction is the intense flavour and tender texture of the finished product. It's completely different from poaching where the 'insert food item here' takes on the flavour of the poaching liquid. Try it, you'll see what I mean.

Top chefs from all over the world use this technique - both the slow and fast method. A little Molecular Gastronomy for the home cook.

I am quite familiar with the idea of sous vide and the fact that professional chefs use it. I am also quite interested in molecular gastronomy. Hopefully an El Bulli cookbook will be coming my way at Xmas.

BUT Putting chicken in a ziplock bag and into 180 degree water for 15 min. is not sous vide. I highly doubt that the chicken will come to an internal temp of 165 in that time, thus leading to questions about food safety.

A real sous vide preparation (vacuum sealed and cooked for longer period at a lower temp) is pretty interesting. Anyone attempting this at home should do it right and not in a zip-lock bag.

Unless done correctly, sous vide raises all kinds of food safety issues, including the risk of botulism (read about that in this very recent article Hence the ban on restaurants using the technique by NYC and also the United States Food and Drug Administration.

There are many other ways for the home cook to prepare a tender chicken breast that are far less complicated and pose far fewer health risks.

If you want to try sous vide at home, you really need to do a lot of homework and do it correctly.
__________________

__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.