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Old 07-22-2008, 02:19 AM   #21
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When you flambé - it will not crisp mushrooms or onions - as the alcohol burns it also vaporizes some of the water in the rum ... so in effect you are "steaming" them - especially due to the amount of water onions and mushrooms naturally contain - the flame is just vaporing the moisture in them.

If you flambé at the end of a dish it is to burn off the raw alcohol taste and just leave the flavor of the alcohol you add ... and in the case of something like Banana's Foster - the flame will lightly caramelize some of the sugars.

Since you are just 18 and have been cooking professionally for 2.5 years - I'm sure there have been some "shortcuts" in your culinary education ... especially since you have questions about basic techniques like deglaze and flambé.

You might want to pick up a copy of Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking - The Science and Lore of the Kitchen (revised edition) and spend some time reading it instead of the time you're spending playing Halo 2 - if you're really serious about cooking.

FWIW - yeah, IMHO the sequals to the Matrix were just lame excuses to capatalize on the success of the original.
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Old 07-22-2008, 02:19 PM   #22
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i mean, when u add the alcohol, i use rum, when i add it, the flam finished the onions and gives them a darker color, and a little bit of a crisp. you only need 2 put in about 1/2-1 cup of rum a the most, so its not like their simmering in the alcohol. and i know how to deglaze, i just wasn't sure if their was a special word 4 it when u add the alcohol to the pan to give it a flavor, and it ends up flaming up. because deglazing is supposed to unstick all the little bits of food. not to just give it flavor from alchahol. because u can use water when deglazing.
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Old 07-22-2008, 02:58 PM   #23
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Deglazing.

It burns because of the properties of the alcohol. I get some flames just by working the pan with oil and veggies in it sometimes. If you used a liquid that had the same flavor as the rum, but it didn't catch fire, it would still be deglazing.
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Old 07-22-2008, 03:50 PM   #24
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Couldn’t you also call it a Reduction since you are reducing the liquid (alcohol) in order to concentrate the flavors.
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Old 07-22-2008, 04:16 PM   #25
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To beat a dead horse:

flambé
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:00 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billdolfski View Post
To beat a dead horse:

flambé
yeah, thats what im trying 2 say, its not as simple as a reduction, or a deglaze, bc those are trying to obtain two different things than what i am. calling what im doing deglazing is like calling a reduction, deglazing something just because it uses alcohol. this is y i asked bc the line isnt clear, and i wasnt sure what to call it. but sofar the only thing that really makes sense is flambé.
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Old 07-22-2008, 05:12 PM   #27
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My POV would be:

If you are using the alcohol for the flame, then it is Flambé.

If you are using the alcohol to release the frond from the pan, then it is Deglazing.

If you are using the alcohol for flavor only and don’t flame, then it is a Reduction.

I think it comes down to intention. There is some reduction in both a Flambé and a Deglaze, but the question becomes what are you trying to do? Are you trying to “flame” the dish, release the frond from the pan, or concentrate the flavors of the liquid?

Your choice of liquid in a Flambé and Deglaze will also add flavor, but again, strictly speaking, what is the intention? You can add flavor with a liquid and never intend to flame it or deglaze the bottom of the pan since you only care about the flavor the liquid imparts.

Just my .02.
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Old 07-22-2008, 10:32 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redgriller View Post
My POV would be:

If you are using the alcohol for the flame, then it is Flambé.

If you are using the alcohol to release the frond from the pan, then it is Deglazing.

If you are using the alcohol for flavor only and don’t flame, then it is a Reduction.

I think it comes down to intention. There is some reduction in both a Flambé and a Deglaze, but the question becomes what are you trying to do? Are you trying to “flame” the dish, release the frond from the pan, or concentrate the flavors of the liquid?

Your choice of liquid in a Flambé and Deglaze will also add flavor, but again, strictly speaking, what is the intention? You can add flavor with a liquid and never intend to flame it or deglaze the bottom of the pan since you only care about the flavor the liquid imparts.

Just my .02.

thanks, thats a much better explination :D
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Old 08-02-2008, 02:10 PM   #29
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So...do you text a lot? j/k!


I know I'm dating myself, but understanding the lingo and deciphering the lack of capitalization and punctuation is like learning an entirely new language!
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Old 08-02-2008, 04:38 PM   #30
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hate to tell you but my $25K education says its deglazing

There are little bits that add the booze will kick up. while your nit sitting there scrapping becuase the onions and what ever natually dont stick to the pan there isnt much.

It would be great to have a special term adding alchohol to a dish (also helps justify a higher cost per plate) there isnt.

Here it is from epicurious
deglaze Definition in the Food Dictionary at Epicurious.com


ohh BTW for the dish:
You can call it something like
Rummed Onions and Mushrooms (or what ever it was.)
Onions and Mushrooms Sauteed in a Spiced Rum


Be creative....
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