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Old 08-03-2008, 12:43 PM   #41
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The only thing I disagree with is that deglazing happens near the end. It VERY often times happens near the beginning, once everything is sauteed but before you start building with the rest of the ingredients in the same pan. When one deglazes with an alcohol of some kind it may actually, also, flame. The vapors from whatever alcohol you are deglazing with will reach the flame and therefore ignite. Sometimes you intentionally tilt the pan to allow this to happen. And there are those times when you don't mean for it to happen but it still does. A commercial gas range will certainly hone in on those vapors a bit easier than your home gas range. Your intent is to deglaze but there is still a flame. I guess that would be a flambaze?
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Old 08-03-2008, 02:02 PM   #42
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I agree, and very funny.

OK,....deglaze at the end of flavour production.....
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Old 08-03-2008, 04:19 PM   #43
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It really comes down to what your intention for adding the booze was. If you were adding it to get the flame and caramelize the the edges of the veggies from the flame then it is flambeing. If you are pouring the booze in to scrape up the fond and it just happens to flame because of the alcohol content then it is deglazing. If you pour the booze in with the intention of of reducing the liquid to concentrate the flavors then it is a reduction. Sure it could be a combination of 2 or all 3 of these techniques, but there generally is an over riding reason why you did it.

k so what im doing is just a combination of a couple things, because im useing the achahol to caramelize the the edges of the onions, wile having it reduce down and add its flavor to the onions and mushrooms. so its a mix of flambeing, and deglazing. that answers my question, all i wanted 2 know from the start is if their was a word 4 what i was doing, but i guess all im doing is just 2 steps at the same time.
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Old 08-03-2008, 05:25 PM   #44
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k so what im doing is just a combination of a couple things, because im useing the achahol to caramelize the the edges of the onions, wile having it reduce down and add its flavor to the onions and mushrooms. so its a mix of flambeing, and deglazing. that answers my question, all i wanted 2 know from the start is if their was a word 4 what i was doing, but i guess all im doing is just 2 steps at the same time.
when you add the spirit to the sauted onions and mushrooms, and set light to the vapour, you are flambeing, although I would suggest you are burning the onions, not caramalizing them, as you don't have much control over what is happening. There is unlikely to be any fonds on the bottom of the pan, so you are not deglazing it, but as the pan cools, and water from the onion and mushrooms mix with the spirit residues, you are forming a reduction.

If you were to saute a steak in the pan, then fonds might be produced, and adding spirit would help to deglaze the pan, but if you set light to it, the main reason would be to add flavour from the spirit, so it is flambe and not deglazing.

Many methods include several techiques which may not be too apparent until we analyse it in detail, and the devil is in the detail, understanding what is going on helps to produce great chefs.

HTH
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Old 08-04-2008, 01:15 PM   #45
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I've always heard the professional chefs say "deglazing".
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Old 08-04-2008, 03:50 PM   #46
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Maybe, just maybe, the difference is when we deglaze it can be done with anything i.e., water, chicken broth, etc. If you use an alcohol, that ignites and flames, that equates to flambeing. It may also deglaze, but, it still ignites, thus the flambe.
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Old 08-04-2008, 06:09 PM   #47
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flambe produces flavour by burning the spirit

deglazing dissolves (and suspends) the flavour which has 'stuck' to the bottom of the pan used to fry/saute/roast meat/vegetables.

How many ways does this need to be said?
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Old 08-04-2008, 06:39 PM   #48
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However, you can deglaze while flambeing.
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Old 08-05-2008, 09:28 AM   #49
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However, you can deglaze while flambeing.
with two pans........
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Old 08-05-2008, 10:06 AM   #50
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With one pan.

If you have a pan with fond on the bottom and add an alcoholic liquid, it will deglaze the pan. If the alcohol ignites in the process, you have a flambe. It serves the dual purpose of bringing the flavors of the fond into a sauce and burning off the alcohol so the flavor of the liquid can be incorporated into the sauce without the harshness of the alcohol.
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