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Old 02-18-2012, 03:00 PM   #1
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What's the best method to cook a steak indoors?

Hello All,
I have always had a hard time figuring out the best way to cook a steak indoors. I am a college student living in an apartment complex with no access to a grill. I love steak but have shied away from buying/cooking one in a while because I have never really had the greatest results. So my question to you DC is what method you would recommend. My options include; stovetop, oven or a george forman. Any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated so I can get back to enjoying a nice cut of meat without spending 20-50 dollars at the local steakhouses.

Thanks!

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Old 02-18-2012, 03:10 PM   #2
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I would use a cast iron grill pan or griddle.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:13 PM   #3
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The best method is on the stove top. The GF grill doesn't get hot enough to cook a good steak properly.

However, cooking steak on the stovetop over high heat will generate some smoke so you really need very good ventilation. A stove hood that recirculates air back into the kitchen won't cut it.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:23 PM   #4
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if you have a gas oven with a broiler, use that.

depending on the thickness of the steaks, you'll have to adjust the broiler tray to the topmost slt for thinner steaks, or the middle slot for thicker steaks. also, adjust cooking times accordingly. a 1 1/2 inch thick steak will take about 6 or 7 minutes per side for rare in the middle slot of a broiler. add another minute or so per side for medium rare. move to the top slot if you like it more charred on the surface.

be sure to wrap the broiler tray in aluminum foil for easy clean up.

btw, you can make kiler buffalo wings using a broiler in the same fashion, flipping the wings a few times util the brown o both sides. they sorta cook in their own fat so they come out a lot like fried wings, albeit a little healhier.

if no broiler, invest in a cast iron grill pan. you'll even get grill marks on your steak with one.

hth.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
I would use a cast iron grill pan or griddle.
+1
and what PF said about ventilation

I'm not a fan of broiled steaks.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:45 PM   #6
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I like the gas oven broiler, too. I have a notion that I've never really researched that cooking a steak by conduction - in a pan or on a range top grill pan - traps steam between the steak and the pan and partly steams, rather than applying dry heat. The broiler is mostly radiant heat, so it's just heat+meat, and the moisture dissipates or drains away.

It's different from the goal of browning meat prior to braising and such. It's not on that hot surface for long. The steak will be in the pan for a while. Like I said, I haven't researched it, but I'm generally happier with the results from the broiler.

But the difference between range top and oven broiler probably isn't that great. What makes a real difference is that, for doing steaks at home, you need to buy them thick, like an inch or inch and a half thick. You can't properly do a thinner steak at home. You don't have the heat for it, and you'll have to leave it on the fire so long to get a nice crust that it will overcook inside. Restaurants can handle it, because they have massive burners and very hot ovens fed by 1-inch gas lines. At home, you need a thick steak in order to have it remain rare or medium rare while it browns.

Save the Foreman grill for common hamburgers and sausage patties and for vegetables, at which it excels.
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Old 02-18-2012, 03:57 PM   #7
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I like the gas oven broiler, too. I have a notion that I've never really researched that cooking a steak by conduction - in a pan or on a range top grill pan - traps steam between the steak and the pan and partly steams, rather than applying dry heat.
I'm an amateur not an expert, and I haven't researched it either, but I have a notion that when you throw a steak on a cast iron pan or griddle that the steak develops a layer of browning that seals in juices and that there isn't much in the way of trapped steam to interfere with heat transfer via conduction. If there is any steam I doubt it plays any but a minor role in cooking the steak.
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Old 02-18-2012, 04:22 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
+1
and what PF said about ventilation

I'm not a fan of broiled steaks.
I think it was Andy talking about ventilation...I've only been thinking about ventilating Shrek today...
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Old 02-18-2012, 04:55 PM   #9
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I would go to your flea market or garage sales and look for a used Farberware indoor grill. It has a big heating element and everything else is stainless steel. It makes a pretty good thick steak.

If that is not possible I would practice making steak au poivre or steak diane.Both are thinner steak recipes.

I have never had good luck with a thicker steak under the broiler or in a pan. It may just be me though.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I'm an amateur not an expert, and I haven't researched it either, but I have a notion that when you throw a steak on a cast iron pan or griddle that the steak develops a layer of browning that seals in juices and that there isn't much in the way of trapped steam to interfere with heat transfer via conduction. If there is any steam I doubt it plays any but a minor role in cooking the steak.
Searing doesn't seal in juices, though. That's a "kitchen myth"

But you need to start with a dry, preferably room temp piece of meat.


Sear and Blast method works well.

Liberally salt your steak.

Get a cast iron skillet very hot.

Turn your oven to 450.

Open a window.

Dry any moisture off the meat.

Plop it in the skillet.

Turn after about 3-4 min and put it into the oven for another 5 or until cooked to your liking.
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