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View Poll Results: When making mashed potato what do you use and why?
Potato masher 31 64.58%
Potato ricer 9 18.75%
Mixer 12 25.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-26-2006, 11:21 AM   #21
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I just use a hand masher most of the time. My wife and I have an inherent incompatibility with this as I lke lumps and she wants silky smooth. Since I do most of the cooking, we generally have lumpy mashed pototoes...

I grew up thinking they had to be smooth like my mom always made them, but found out that I prefer more texture than that.

Quote:
Chunky mashed potatoes are fine for some restaurants but if you serve mashed potatoes with chunks at a fine dining restaurant you'll get reamed.


To Ironchef... not all "fine dining" establishments have that requirement. I've eaten in a couple of very good places here in the Denver area which serve good (= lumpy ) mashed potatoes.
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Old 05-26-2006, 04:19 PM   #22
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Thanks Urmaniac13, it looks like a garlic press alright.You guys acutally subject potatoes to this?Oh be nice, lumpy does it for me.Anyway, different peeps, different strokes. Enjoy your spuds whichever way you like them.
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Old 05-26-2006, 04:54 PM   #23
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I use a mixer. I only like chunks in potato salad. My mashed potatoes HAVE to be smooth. Anything that I mix into it, get mixed in with a spoon after the mixer.
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Old 05-26-2006, 06:20 PM   #24
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Mashed Potatoes

Hi Texasgirl:
this is bigjim, one thing that mother taught me when she was teaching me
how to cook when I was a boy, was any leftover mashed potatoes go into
making potato salad. that`s why when i make potato salad, I always mash
my potatoes. I have three grown son`s and they would`nt have it any
other way. I really like this website. I get talk to people from all over the
globe. Texasgirl, you take care and God bless......
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Old 05-26-2006, 07:08 PM   #25
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The problem with mixers are that they overwork the potato and they break the potato's starch granules which gives off that gummy and overly creamy texture. The potato may become smooth, but it will never have that same texture that comes from using either a ricer or even a food mill.

The type of potato being used also plays apart. Russets and Reds have higher starch contents and tend to produce a heavier mashed potato, especially if they get overworked. Yukon Golds have a nice balance of starch and texture and can be made into a lighter and fluffier mashed potato. White potatoes fall between Yukon Golds and Reds in terms of texture and starch.
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Old 05-26-2006, 07:16 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin
To Ironchef... not all "fine dining" establishments have that requirement. I've eaten in a couple of very good places here in the Denver area which serve good (= lumpy ) mashed potatoes.
I think in about the early to mid 90's, there was a trend in "chunky" mashed potatoes found in all kinds of restaurants which was commonly called "Smashed Potatoes" due to the fact that there would be bits and pieces of potato still in there.

With the trend going towards more smoother type purees or mousselines (i.e. Salsify, Sunchoke, Celeriac, Yuca, etc.), chunkier versions of mashed potatoes are being phased out in many restaurants, at least on the fine dining end of the spectrum.
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Old 05-26-2006, 08:55 PM   #27
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I use a mixer because it's the only thing
I have
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Old 05-26-2006, 09:06 PM   #28
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Oh gosh, one of our first purchases on Ebay was a ricer.

No, not the usual flimsy ricer one finds in grocery or cooking supply stores, this is a King Kong ricer.

Don't know where or how it was made, but this is one large, and well made, ricer.

Cannot fill the bowl and rice the suckers, it is that big and don't have the strength to do the job.

Can only do it with the bowl about half full.

Sometimes will just rice the taters, add some butter, pepper, a tad salt, and enjoy them that way.

Or make them into mashed spuds.

Also, sometimes, take the boiled potatoes and use the hand masher. Depends upon whether we want to have a few lumps in the mix.

And will use the hand mixer. Have never found them 'gummy' but am very careful with the mixer and with a bit of butter and then cream; they taste okay to me. And they are smooth But then again I grew up with mash being made that way, and it is comfort food.

The fun with mash is what we can add to them.

Garlic cloves, mashed turnips, carrots, or parsnips. Maybe some mustard, or whatever spice we feel like.

And then, of course, the question is gravy or not.

Love mashed spuds, and there are so many ways to make them.

Take care and God bless.
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Old 05-26-2006, 09:13 PM   #29
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I'd like to have no lumps in my mashed potoatoes, like my mom's. But, sad to say, my mashed potatoes often do have a few lumps here and there. I have thought of buying a ricer, but then that's just one more thing to clean. My mom never uses a mixer or a ricer...just the masher thing-y. The potatoes have to be cooked evenly enough, I'm guessing, to make them easy to mash. Shocking to me is that my daughter's (daughters' <-- and that apostrophe is significant) friends have often never had anything other than mashed potatoes from a box. It's not that intimidating of a dish that someone would rather have it from a box, aye?
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Old 05-26-2006, 10:51 PM   #30
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I didn't vote because I use all three. It totally depends on the texture I am trying to achieve.

I like "rustic" (lumpy with skins) - it's a masher. For some things like gnocchi where I need a dryer fluffly potato - I use a ricer. For "creamed" potatoes .... velvety smooth with butter, sour cream, etc. - it's a hand mixer.
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