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View Poll Results: When making mashed potato what do you use and why?
Potato masher 31 64.58%
Potato ricer 9 18.75%
Mixer 12 25.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 48. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-28-2006, 10:33 PM   #41
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I am accustomed to the old way's, I use the original potato masher. This to me... gives it a firmer texture and allows you to have hands on the dish.

"Don't get me wrong," the new ways have spoiled me to many other modern technilogical gadgets.
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Old 05-29-2006, 12:53 AM   #42
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has no one else made lobster mashed pota-yuh-toes?

if you haven't, and you usually just chuck out the little leggies on a lobster, give it a try. use the water from boiling the lobsters to boil the spuds, then mash them with butter and a little of the water (and the tomalley if you dare). roll the meat out of the legs with a rolling pin, and fold meat into the mash.
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Old 05-29-2006, 02:59 AM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
has no one else made lobster mashed pota-yuh-toes?
I've made something like that, but different than the the recipe you posted. I made the mash out of yukon golds and then incorporated the lobster coral into it.
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Old 05-29-2006, 11:38 AM   #44
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Hi bucky, I saw this recipe on the Food network this past week. I was curious to the taste. Since you are familiar with this dish, How is the taste? Is it rich? It looked delicious.
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Old 05-29-2006, 02:38 PM   #45
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We had mashed potatoes last night. We added butter, bacon bits, sour cream, cheddar & dh put scallions in his. They were sooo good! We used a masher for this. I wish we had leftovers!
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Old 05-29-2006, 06:25 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
Please explain.

Personally, I prefer mixer, I'll use potato masher if need to be, but I would never use potato ricer, and in my opinion, you do not get the right Consistency if you do. It doesn't taste like mashed potato, it doesn't feel like mash potato, it is just not right.
What do you think?
For mashed potatoes (if I want them smooth), I use a potato masher, never a mixer. A mixer will make them gummy. A ricer, if you want a grainy texture for certain recipes, potato waffles and such. One of my favorite comfort foods - potatoes peeled, cut in chunks, boiled, drained, and lightly mixed with a fork adding mayo, salt and pepper -- very chunky & tasty luke warm.

Mashed - almost anything goes. I like mashed carrots combined in the mashed taters, a little s & P, and butter. A tasty twist - adding artichokes, butter, s&p. Have you tried mixing in those french fried onions that come in a can? Not gourmet, but pretty good. Cream cheese with chives and onions is another good combo.
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Old 05-29-2006, 11:47 PM   #47
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quizzie, do you remember what show was it on?

i've had them in restaurants, and made it at home. can't seem to match the strong lobster flavor that you get in restaurants, but yes, if made well, it's rich and buttery, with delicious pieces of lobster throughout. lobster and butter, and potatoes and butter were made for each other, so it's a perfect match. i've also had it with roasted garlic which was very good too.

it's possible they use a lobster stock to boil and blend the potatoes.
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Old 06-03-2006, 07:11 AM   #48
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I use a masher because that's what I have. I don't mind them made with a mixer if people don't get carried away -- I don't like them to become gummy. I love "riced" potatoes, but, well, as some say, it is a one-trick pony, and I don't make mashed potatoes often enough to own a ricer.
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Old 06-03-2006, 08:46 PM   #49
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I use all three at one time or another. I prefer riced 'cause nothing holds more gravey than riced!
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Old 06-03-2006, 11:25 PM   #50
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For mashed potatoes, it is the combination of potato variety, fat, liquid, and seasonings that give them their characteristic texture and flavor. Potatoes boiled with the skin on, then skinned and mashed have an earthier flavor than potatoes that have been peeled before boiling. Also, the more delicate texture of Yukon Gold, Red Rose, White Rose, and other so-called waxy potatoes require less fat than do Russets. If too much butter is added, the waxy potatoes become heavy and gummy. But with Russets, extra butter reduces the grainy texture of the potato.

I like my potatoes silky smooth, and rich in flavor. I use both a ricer and potato masher. Riced potatoes by themselves can be grainy, depending on the potato variety used. But if you use a very fine grained potato like Yukon Gold, the flavor and texture are delicate and sweet, respectively.

For mashed potatoes, I rice the potatoes, then add salt and mash them with a hand masher. I taste to see if the amount of salt is correct. I then add butter and condensed milk. This adds a rich flavor and makes them very smooth and light, but with enough body to satisfy.

I'm sorry that I can't quantify the amounts because I eyeball everything and adjust as I go, testing frequently for flavor and texture. The end result is a stiff mashed potato, but not pasty or gooey. The potatoes when served, should hold their shape on the plate and easily be formed to create a crater in the middle to hold whatever sauce, butter, compound butter, or gravy that is served with the meal.

The ricer insures a lump-free final dish, while the mechanical mashing incorporates the seasonings, liquid, and fat. This takes a bit more work, but I try to give my very best to whomever is going to eat what I prepare. I'm kind of obssesive about that.

The only problem I have with mashed potatoes (in my house we call them smashed spuds) is that I can only eat them rarely, and in small quantities. They just are not good for my blood glucose levels. But they are yummy. And as for seasonings, good butter and salt are all I need. But that's just personal preferrence. Added flavoings like chicken soup base, garlic, onion, etc., add wonderful variety to mashed potatoes.

Recently, and for the first time, I added cooked carrots to the potatoes before ricing them. My wife absolutely loved them. But I'm still a smashed spuds purest. I like mine with just a bit of salt.

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