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Old 12-27-2006, 10:48 AM   #21
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The burner is also good to use as a wok cooker for authentic wok temperature cooking.
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Old 12-27-2006, 01:15 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Half Baked
Aryton, you'd be the most popular man in Greece. Start a side business and fry a few to sell.

My son frys meats all the time in his.
Sigh, I'm beginning to feel like a cross-dresser.

Half Baked, I'll let you know if I start that side business. In the meantime, please note I'd actually be the most popular WOman in Greece ...
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Old 01-01-2007, 07:49 PM   #23
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Sorry, but it took us a week to get pics off the camera.

Here's a pic of the pig:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v306/HWooldridge/deepfriedpig.jpg

...and I also did a chicken while I was at it (no sense wasting 4 gallons of oil):

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v306/HWooldridge/deepfriedchicken.jpg

The pig weighed 10 lbs before cooking. We injected half a bottle of Tony Chacere's marinade (the other half went into the chicken) and coated the outside with Tony Chacere's Cajun Seasoning. Oil was about 350 upon entry and I left it in for 35 minutes. Was quite a hit with the family and everyone ate it with relish. The only problem was that thin places like the ribs were crispy but the hams were perfect. I think if someone had regular access to these small pigs that it would be good to scald off the hair and leave the skin on. Would protect the meat and provide some cracklins'. At any rate, I can highly recommend it if you get the chance.


Feel free to ask questions - I'll try to answer promptly...
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Old 01-01-2007, 11:52 PM   #24
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How was this pig dressed out? Did you have to kill it yourself? Was it skinned? I was looking at the pic; is that a leg at the top or a head/snout?

This was the "real thing" when they roast something like this in a movie/tv, it looks like a roast or something that you would find at the grocery store.

That chicken looked unusually plump. Was it a roaster?

Thank you for sharing this. It is ever so interesting.
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Old 01-02-2007, 06:23 PM   #25
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This may be more than you want to know...

In general, many parts of the South and much of Texas have large populations of descendants from hogs that escaped domestication over the years - dating from the Spanish right down to modern farms. For the most part, these pigs cannot be distinguished from commercial hogs, except that wild hogs may be a bit leaner. They are also a commercial and agricultural pest, responsible for millions of dollars in loss every year and so are considered a pest plus there is no bag limit or season. If properly dressed, the meat is indistinguishable from store-bought.

One of my sons was working recently on a cattle ranch which has a plague of hogs. The rancher sets traps to catch these hogs when no one is around but the traps must be checked every few days to keep them from dying. Typically, the traps have holes large enough to let the small pigs (shoats) run in and out. Otherwise, the large hogs may kill the little ones before someone can attend to the trap.

My son killed one of these small pigs and dressed it the same day. Basically, it was gutted, skinned and the head removed. The top of the pic is a leg because the head was gone.

The chicken was a normal fryer from the grocery store - weighed 4.5 lbs before cooking. In the oil for 20 minutes and fully cooked.

I know some folks may think this type of food is unhealthy but I have found that deep frying at the proper oil temp (350-375 on my thermometer) will seal the meat/fowl and keeps the juices well contained without making the food overly oily. In addition, we don't eat it every day - moderation in all things...
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:26 PM   #26
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HW:

I've heard about the wild pig problem in Texas. You're providing a valuable public service by eating the buggers.
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Old 01-03-2007, 02:31 AM   #27
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My brother-in-law moved to Louisiana some years back. He has always been a hunter and fisherman. He has mentioned hunting wild boar. Their Dad's teaching is: "if you can't eat it, don't hunt (kill) it." I will ask him what he is doing with them (cooking); they sound like one in the same animal.
Thank you for sharing so much information. Would it have been easier to handle the pig if it were cut into sections? (leg of pig, hind quarter) just wondering.
I have not read where anyone has deep fried a duck or goose or even a rabbit. Any plans for that?
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Old 01-03-2007, 07:41 PM   #28
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StirBlue,

This pig was perfect size whole but a larger one would require cutting into some convenient portion. My deep fryer will easily hold a 25-30 lb turkey so I base sizes on what I have.

My wife and I love duck so she wants me to try deep frying one - just need to harvest one or two. The pig was good but I personally feel that the best candidates for the process are meats that would normally be drier or leaner using a more conventional method - venison might be an outstanding choice but I need to experiment.

Your bro-in-law most likely is harvesting the same thing we are - and those Cajun boys will eat anything deep fried - heck, they invented it...
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Old 01-03-2007, 08:24 PM   #29
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What kind of side dishes are you and your wife having with this food? And dessert?
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Old 01-03-2007, 08:36 PM   #30
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Usually make up a pot of beans ahead of time or bake potatoes as a side dish. We typically don't eat dessert but occasionally will split a cookie between us. Ice tea and a loaf of bread - you have a full meal...
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