"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-20-2011, 08:29 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2
Electric smokers

I am new to smoking. 225 seems to be the best temp, but how often do I add wood chips. Also the chips seem pretty big. Are there different chips avaliable?

__________________

__________________
beets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 08:45 AM   #2
Master Chef
 
Snip 13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Brakpan, South Africa
Posts: 5,431
Hi and welcome to DC! I have no idea about the smoker but someone will come and help shortly as always. Loads of people that know there stuff when it comes to smoking here :)
__________________

__________________
Odette
"I used to jog but the ice cubes kept falling out of my glass."

"I hear voices and they don't like you "
Snip 13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 11:27 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
Josie1945's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Sunny Central Florida
Posts: 2,004
Welcome to DC.

Josie
__________________
Practice Random Acts of Kindness ( RAK ) Makes you feel great too
Josie1945 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 11:57 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Timothy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: St. Augustine, Florida
Posts: 2,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by beets View Post
I am new to smoking. 225 seems to be the best temp, but how often do I add wood chips. Also the chips seem pretty big. Are there different chips available?
All foods do not smoke the same. Some require much less smoking time and some are better with certain types of wood.

If you smoke cheese exactly the same as you smoke a pork shoulder, you'll end up with cheese that tastes like burnt firewood.

If you smoke a fish fillet the same as you smoke a whole chicken, again, you'll end up eating something nasty.

Learning to smoke various foods correctly is an art. With today's Internet information, it should be easy to find "recipes" for smoking almost anything.

You're in the right group for that!

Here's my favorite; I use cherry wood chips for smoking mild flavored white fish meat. I use only a handful of dry chips that burn out in the first 5 minutes. It adds a tiny bit of sweet smoke flavor to the fish without overwhelming the fish itself.

There are as many smoking recipes as there are items to be smoked. Perhaps others will share their personal favorites here in this thread!
__________________
Confirmed Sushi Addict
Timothy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 12:50 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Dawgluver's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 24,119
I just got a stove top smoker. You cook on medium with it. 1 or 2 T. of almost sawdust-like wood chips gives stuff a great flavor from it. I think the other types of smokers use bigger chips. I read you can grind some bigger chips in a coffee/spice grinder to make the sawdust for the stove top smoker, haven't tried it yet.

BTW, welcome to DC!
__________________
She who dies with the most toys, wins.
Dawgluver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2011, 03:28 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,321
Up at The Lake, my cousin has a Brinkman smoker. It was a charcoal one, but he converted it to electric because he can't regulate it when he's out fishing. It looked interesting. Pros and cons of that brand (I can convert it to electric)? I haven't spent my allowance re: what I can bring back...thinking a smoker or a meat grinder...

FWIW, I've brought back all kinds of things--including kitchen sink!
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2011, 02:16 AM   #7
Sous Chef
 
hamm4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 595
I have both a stovetop and an electric outdoor smoker. I love them both. I usually use the stovetop for everyday cooking. I cook fish, chicken, ribs, mac and cheese etc. You can find many recipes online. I usually buy chips online from amazon because you can get an assortment cheap. 2-3 Tbsp in the stovetop is enough to cook most meats. The electric one I add more wood if the smoke seems to die down. It is definitely trail and error, but the results are well worth it. Yummy
__________________
hamm4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2013, 12:30 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 2,843
I have been using a Brinkman tunnel smoker for several years now, with so so results. Its a wood or charcoal fired unit.
It is very hard to regulate temperature. It is also very inefficient. It is my opinion that electric or gas would serve me much better.

One of the biggest mistakes I have seen was to much smoke. I have seen beautiful chickens and roasts ruined by over smoking. Not over cooking, over smoking.

I have found that just a wiff of light smoke is the very best visual guide as to how much smoke flavor you want to impart.
I can say with confidence, the less smoke, the better the result.

So my next smoker will be electric or gas. I will use wood chunks or chips in a very limited manner.
But the most important thing is regulating temperature and that is almost impossible with wood or charcoal unless you are baby sitting the smoker.
__________________
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2013, 02:23 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I have been using a Brinkman tunnel smoker for several years now, with so so results. Its a wood or charcoal fired unit.
It is very hard to regulate temperature. It is also very inefficient. It is my opinion that electric or gas would serve me much better.

One of the biggest mistakes I have seen was to much smoke. I have seen beautiful chickens and roasts ruined by over smoking. Not over cooking, over smoking.

I have found that just a wiff of light smoke is the very best visual guide as to how much smoke flavor you want to impart.
I can say with confidence, the less smoke, the better the result.

So my next smoker will be electric or gas. I will use wood chunks or chips in a very limited manner.
But the most important thing is regulating temperature and that is almost impossible with wood or charcoal unless you are baby sitting the smoker.
That is simply not true with the right equipment. I can set the vents on my BGE to maintain 225 F for a whole packer brisket cook. Don't need any fancy gadgets either.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2013, 07:41 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Park Drive Bar/Grill Los Angeles
Posts: 9,640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
But the most important thing is regulating temperature and that is almost impossible with wood or charcoal unless you are baby sitting the smoker.
The problem is your particular model of Brinkman smoker. I converted my el cheapo Brinkman electric smoker for charcoal use only, plus did a few minor modifications on the vents and to seal the unit. Now I can run it with no water in the pan for several hours and hold temps between 250 to 300, for instance, without having to babysit the smoker. My el cheapo Brinkman now runs as efficiently as a $300 Weber Smokey Mountain.
__________________

__________________
roadfix is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
electric

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.