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Old 11-25-2005, 12:05 PM   #1
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Extreme Cold Weather Deep Fry Turkey

The first time I tried to deep fry a turkey some years ago the weather was extremely cold and was extremely windy. When the oil was up to temperature, I put the turkey in and and the oil temperature dropped well below 350 degrees. Because of the wind and cold, the oil would not rise back to temp. The fryer was losing heat as almost as fast as the burner could replace it.

Result: A substandard oily turkey due to the peanut oil at too low a temp. Was a dissapointing Thanksgiving day.

This Thanksgiving, the weather was 20 degrees and 20 mph wind gusts

Solution: Using items I found in my garage, left over piece of drywall (4'x4'), 2 small piece of 2x4's and approx. 2'x2' piece of plywood.

I built an enclosure for the turkey fryer. I cut the drywall in half and then scored the remaining 2'x4' pieces down the middle, folding them to make half a box, screwed the corners togetether with the 2x4's. Put the 2 halves together to form a box and put the piece of plywood to make a lid. I left the lid partially open for air and exaust to escape.

One can make a box using anything (non-flamable preferred) Being Thanksgiving day I had to use whatever I had layin around.

The result was spectacular. The enclosure blocked the wind, held in the heat, perfect turkey!! Prefect turkey day.

For saftey I did keep a fire extinguisher nearby

Troymeister

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Old 11-25-2005, 08:07 PM   #2
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I had a friend who did exactly the same thing, although I don't think he used drywall. He also said it worked great.

My husband has what he calls a garage, and I call a barn. It is a big pole-barn, with a concrete floor, very high ceiling, more square footage than the ground floor of our house, 2 garage doors in the front, and a huge sliding door in the back. (also a stereo, fridge with his favorite beverage, and other assorted ammentities.
He fries the turkeys out there, close to an open garage door and a fire extinguisher. He also knows what he is doing, which makes a big difference.
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Old 12-17-2005, 05:27 PM   #3
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I never even knew about deep-fried turkey until 2002 when I visted one of my brothers (he passed away last Christmas) who lived with his wife in Columbia, SC.

He told me about it and was cooking two of them for Memorial Day. I tried it or course, and have liked it ever since!

But since I live in an apartment and can't use an outdoor propane-powered turkey fryer, I opted to get the Turk N' Surf electric turkey fryer. I fried a turkey in it and boy was it good! Deep-fried turkey is much quicker to do as opposed to roasting one, which takes hours.


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Old 12-17-2005, 08:15 PM   #4
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Corey, what size turkey did you fry? Did you see any downsides with the Turk N' Surf fryer?

This is the first I've heard of it, and as much as I love deep-fried turkey, I HATE using my propane-powered fryer.

Lee
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Old 12-17-2005, 08:34 PM   #5
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The limit is a 14-lb. turkey or less. The turkey that I cooked in it WAS 14lbs.

But that's alright by me, since I'm alone. Not much in the form of downsides.
Like the propane-powered units, you must let the oil reach a temp of 400 degrees. This takes up to an hour. The tempurature thermostat must be set at 400 degrees.

What is it that you hate about using your propane-powered fryer? If you are still interested in getting the Turk N' Surf, Ron Popeil has a website that sells them, along with ChefsCatalog.com. But the ones at Chefs are higher in price.

I got mine from Popeil's website for $131.00 last spring. I can't remember the address though.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-

I just checked the address. it's http://www.popeilfamilystore.com .


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Old 12-17-2005, 08:52 PM   #6
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Corey,

It's a lot of hot oil, with no lid, over a lot of gas and a lot of fire. Huge potential for disaster, which has been realized by unlucky propane turkey-frying people in the past.

As I said, I love the taste and speed of deep-fried turkey, so I've used my propane fryer a bunch of times. But it does make me nervous.

Lee
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Old 12-17-2005, 09:14 PM   #7
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Well, once you try the electric one, if you still desire to get one, you won't have to worry about those dangers.

The only real danger with the electric ones is electrocution. As with any electric appliance, the heater control unit, as you know, must never be submereged into any liquid. But if you follow the guidlines very carefully, your chances of successfully obtaining good results can't miss.

The main advantage that an electric turkey fryer has over a propane-powered one is that you can use the electric one indoors year round, rain or shine, winter or summer. And you are not just limited to just deep frying a turkey! You can also do chicken wings and quarters, fries and turkey legs. You also can steam lobsters, crabs, corn-on-the-cob, vegetables, potatoes - all the fixins' for a clambake! The possibilities are endless!

With the propane-powered units, only peanut oil can be used, but with the electric ones, any cooking oil can be used. There's no mention that you must use only peanut oil. Besides, that's too expensive to use like that.


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