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Old 07-23-2011, 01:52 PM   #1
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For Hunters, Fishermen and Campers . . . .

I hunt and fish perhaps 70 days of the year, (I live in Prince George, on the doorstep of wilderness) mostly either day trips or overnighters. I've struggled with food prep for a long time, and really don't want just a sandwich, a bag of chips and a thermos of coffee when I'm outdoors.

I've found that by taking

a) 2 or 3 prepared foods that taste good at room temperature in plastic containers
b) 1 or 2 items that are cooked that only need reheating, such as sausages or diced baked potatoes in plastic containers
c) a bodum and some decent coffee in a small plastic container,

I can take a one burner stove, a 10" saute pan with an 8" double-handled mini stock pot, a spoon, a plate, and pack the whole shebang in a reasonably sized zip-type soft cooler, and eat very well without hassle, mess, or taking up a lot of space. The pot takes most of the containers inside of it, and fits into the saute pan, which also has double handles.

I often just cut a pair of chopsticks on site. I usually wear a beltknife, so there are no sharp edges in my pack. This prep has saved so much hassle you wouldn't believe it. I'm usually doing this alone, but simply pack more food in larger containers if I'm with others.

When hunting or fishing, there is usually enough gear that you don't need additional problems. I always pre-season and prepare the foods ahead of time because packing condiments is messy.

If you think things out and wash it up when you return, this pack is ready to go, self contained, at any time.

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Old 07-23-2011, 03:54 PM   #2
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Is that wilderness in Prince George Virginia?
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:11 PM   #3
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i'm all about "ruffing" it while camping..

what i do to insure a meal at the end of the night is set up a trout line... about 4 treble hooks on one line and let it sit for about 4 hours before checking.. always works.. and of course i take the family out to lure as well.. good times
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:42 PM   #4
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I like camping but always take too much equipment with me and don't use half of it while i'm away.
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:50 PM   #5
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Hi I'm new... haven't been camping in years but I miss it!
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Old 09-16-2011, 12:37 PM   #6
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We have been using the Deadwood Stove for our family camping trips this summer. Its nice not having to take along fuel, the places we go always have sticks and such to use. Its a good stove but is not a backpacking rig. The Emberlit Stove is a good hiking stove.

These 2 stoves are the best options for outdoor/camp cooking in my opinion. I should post a review...
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:38 PM   #7
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I did a little research on this type of stove and found that they are quite easy and economical to make.

Most if not all of the materials are free.

I'll be making one very soon. Thanks for the heads up. :-D
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Manning
We have been using the Deadwood Stove for our family camping trips this summer. Its nice not having to take along fuel, the places we go always have sticks and such to use. Its a good stove but is not a backpacking rig. The Emberlit Stove is a good hiking stove.
http://www.emberlit.com/
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