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Old 12-20-2013, 11:53 AM   #81
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Have you tried making smaller burgers? We make them about 6 ounces each.
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:29 PM   #82
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Have you tried making smaller burgers? We make them about 6 ounces each.
I have, but I haven't really thought about it being an issue.
This is without a doubt my favorite burger joint. This is a full 13 oz. prime sirloin burger from Le Tub Saloon in Hollywood, Florida. It takes about 40 minutes to get your burger after ordering. Their grill is small so if the place is crowded, the wait can be up to an hour and a half! (still, well worth it). This is the best cheeseburger I have ever had in my 50 years. (please note, this is not me in the pic.)


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Old 12-20-2013, 02:06 PM   #83
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Some things I have found out in my years of burger cooking.
1. Season well.
2. Let the meat come to room temp before grilling.
3. Hi heat- short time.
4. Use a good thermometer.


I took a cooking class one time and the chef said we have two temperatures we cook at. Hot and hotter. I let my grill get very hot. When you let the meat (I do steaks this way) come to room temp, you can get the sear on the outside, the correct temp on the inside and not turn the outside into phase 1 charcoal. Alos I use 85/15 meat. I know, I know - but the flavor as Chief said is created when the fat sizzles.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:22 AM   #84
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Breakthrough!

Hi all.
I donít usually like to bring back old threads but I felt compelled to let everyone know what is going on with my burger woes. First, I want to thank everyone that helped me with their tips, tricks, and processes. I want to let everyone know that as time went by, I wasnít gaining any success, whatsoever. To recap, I simply couldnít create a great backyard grilled burger. I mean, they were good, just not fantastic. They were missing a certain flavor element that all restaurant grilled burgers have. To be truthful, this flavor is impossible to describe. Itís just a great backyard char-grilled flavor that went missing on my burgers.


Iíve spent an incredible amount of time (and banging my head against a wall) trying to recreate this flavor on my own grill. Believe me, I tried everything. The hours of research boggles the mind. I was determined to get answers. Why were my grilled burgers lacking flavor?


This might sound a bit strange but my biggest discovery thus far has been the fact that 99.9% of the entire population doesnít know or doesnít care about missing flavor elements in their grilled burgers. A burger comes off the grill and it tasted good, thatís all they know. This is not to disparage the fine community, here, itís just that Iím after something that people just donít understand or just donít care about. I care! Where was I to turn if no one understood?


I had a breakthrough!! Thatís right, I now fully understand what I was doing wrong all along. I kept going back to my favorite burger joints, trying to put together an element that I was missing. I realized that restaurants use a commercial char griller. Wait, though, would that make a difference? Do I need to purchase a commercial char griller? Not quite. Hereís my breakthrough; Iíve never seen a restaurant with a lid on their grill. Itís that simple. The burgers are seared with extremely intense radiant heat at the cooking grate. Weíre talking temperatures in excess of 650 degrees. When you close the lid on a consumer grade grill, youíre using mostly convective heat, essentially baking the burger. This was robbing my burger of massive amounts of flavor and drying it out.


Another big discovery I made was the fact that almost all consumer grilles sold today just canít cook with the lid up. Theyíre designed to cook with the lid down. They just canít produce enough heat to properly sear a burger. On my own grill, (Genesis S-310) I doubt the temperature at the cooking grate could maintain 250 degrees with the lid up. I thought about investing in a new infrared grill but I just got my Genesis and I think it might outlive me.


How was I going to create this kind of heat on my grill? I thought about Grillgrates and the concept became clear. Grillgrates cover the grilling surface, trapping heat underneath and concentrating it onto the cooking surface instead of it wasting away into the air. I was sold but I wanted to experiment, first, before spending any money. I covered my entire grill grate with foil. Donít laugh, I know this is essentially frying a burger but bear with me a moment. I noticed that infrared grilles all had tiny holes drilled into the heating element/grilling surface. I poked tiny holes in the foil, between the grate rods, lots of them. Since this was a hardware experiment and not a software one, I was unconcerned that I was using pre-frozen ground meat. I preheated my grill and tossed on a couple of half pound chuck patties. They sizzled and smoke immediately! They smelled wonderful. Unlike my last experiment with the lid up, this was working! The burgers were actually searing with the lid up. Heat was being retained beautifully. Small amounts of fat drippings were dripping down into the heat tents but flare-ups were not an issue. These were the best burgers my grill has ever produced. Iíve repeated it twice, already. Iím going to be buying Grillgrates for my grill shortly.


Sorry for the long post and thanks, again, to everyone.
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Old 07-29-2014, 07:55 AM   #85
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You have discovered how to turn your grill into a flat top. Ever tried an Ollie Burger?

Recipe(tried): Geniune Lum's Ollieburger and Bun Sauce - Recipelink.com
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Old 07-29-2014, 09:25 AM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mborner View Post
Hi all.
I donít usually like to bring back old threads but I felt compelled to let everyone know what is going on with my burger woes. First, I want to thank everyone that helped me with their tips, tricks, and processes. I want to let everyone know that as time went by, I wasnít gaining any success, whatsoever. To recap, I simply couldnít create a great backyard grilled burger. I mean, they were good, just not fantastic. They were missing a certain flavor element that all restaurant grilled burgers have. To be truthful, this flavor is impossible to describe. Itís just a great backyard char-grilled flavor that went missing on my burgers.


Iíve spent an incredible amount of time (and banging my head against a wall) trying to recreate this flavor on my own grill. Believe me, I tried everything. The hours of research boggles the mind. I was determined to get answers. Why were my grilled burgers lacking flavor?


This might sound a bit strange but my biggest discovery thus far has been the fact that 99.9% of the entire population doesnít know or doesnít care about missing flavor elements in their grilled burgers. A burger comes off the grill and it tasted good, thatís all they know. This is not to disparage the fine community, here, itís just that Iím after something that people just donít understand or just donít care about. I care! Where was I to turn if no one understood?


I had a breakthrough!! Thatís right, I now fully understand what I was doing wrong all along. I kept going back to my favorite burger joints, trying to put together an element that I was missing. I realized that restaurants use a commercial char griller. Wait, though, would that make a difference? Do I need to purchase a commercial char griller? Not quite. Hereís my breakthrough; Iíve never seen a restaurant with a lid on their grill. Itís that simple. The burgers are seared with extremely intense radiant heat at the cooking grate. Weíre talking temperatures in excess of 650 degrees. When you close the lid on a consumer grade grill, youíre using mostly convective heat, essentially baking the burger. This was robbing my burger of massive amounts of flavor and drying it out.


Another big discovery I made was the fact that almost all consumer grilles sold today just canít cook with the lid up. Theyíre designed to cook with the lid down. They just canít produce enough heat to properly sear a burger. On my own grill, (Genesis S-310) I doubt the temperature at the cooking grate could maintain 250 degrees with the lid up. I thought about investing in a new infrared grill but I just got my Genesis and I think it might outlive me.


How was I going to create this kind of heat on my grill? I thought about Grillgrates and the concept became clear. Grillgrates cover the grilling surface, trapping heat underneath and concentrating it onto the cooking surface instead of it wasting away into the air. I was sold but I wanted to experiment, first, before spending any money. I covered my entire grill grate with foil. Donít laugh, I know this is essentially frying a burger but bear with me a moment. I noticed that infrared grilles all had tiny holes drilled into the heating element/grilling surface. I poked tiny holes in the foil, between the grate rods, lots of them. Since this was a hardware experiment and not a software one, I was unconcerned that I was using pre-frozen ground meat. I preheated my grill and tossed on a couple of half pound chuck patties. They sizzled and smoke immediately! They smelled wonderful. Unlike my last experiment with the lid up, this was working! The burgers were actually searing with the lid up. Heat was being retained beautifully. Small amounts of fat drippings were dripping down into the heat tents but flare-ups were not an issue. These were the best burgers my grill has ever produced. Iíve repeated it twice, already. Iím going to be buying Grillgrates for my grill shortly.


Sorry for the long post and thanks, again, to everyone.
Thnis is precisely why I use a Webber Kettle, charcoal grill. I can cook with the lid up, with a full load of charcoal and get teh 650' radiant heat, or cover and adjust vents to make jerky. It's so versatile, and costs a fraction of the price of a gas grill. But that's just me.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-29-2014, 09:27 AM   #87
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My charcoal grill doesn't seem to have any issues with getting hot enough at the grates with the lid up. If you gas grill does then I suspect you have something wrong with the grill or it is a poorly designed one (particularly if it won't get above 250F with the lid up)
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Old 07-29-2014, 09:34 AM   #88
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...I covered my entire grill grate with foil. Donít laugh, I know this is essentially frying a burger but bear with me a moment. ...
You can accomplish the same thing with a hot cast iron skillet on the stove.
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Old 07-29-2014, 11:31 AM   #89
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You can accomplish the same thing with a hot cast iron skillet on the stove.
Except for the smoke, unless you're willing to turn off all of your smoke alarms.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 07-29-2014, 11:50 AM   #90
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My charcoal grill doesn't seem to have any issues with getting hot enough at the grates with the lid up. If you gas grill does then I suspect you have something wrong with the grill or it is a poorly designed one (particularly if it won't get above 250F with the lid up)
I have the same Weber gas grill as the poster and it's probably one of the best designed grills on the market. Mine gets plenty hot for cooking with the lid up - especially when using the searing burner feature.

To be honest, I don't like the grill screaming hot when making something like burgers. Doing so usually results in the outside of the burger being overcooked and the inside raw. I turn mine down to the second large mark on the burner control, and let it cook a little longer on each side. This seems to give the right amount of outer char while still leaving a slightly pink middle, which is the way I like them.

One other thing I'll add. The type of cut used for burgers makes a HUGE difference in flavor. I've seen recipes that call for all chuck or all sirloin. Personally, my favorite is a mix of 60% sirloin and 40% chuck. Nice fatty chuck, because fat = flavor. And the sirloin also adds a flavor component that can't be duplicated with cheap meat, making any burger taste more like a good steak.

Dang. This made me hungry. I think we'll be having burgers for dinner tonight.
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