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Old 04-18-2011, 03:44 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post

Ahhh, the sound of electric rotisserie motors, struggling to get the heavy end up and over... childhood memories.
This unit came with a hefty counterweight which attaches at the opposite end of the rod. I'll probably need it when roasting a 15lb turkey...

But I agree, rotisseries are not as popular as they once were. In fact, I think Weber even discontinued their rotisserie kits for a while a little while back.
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Old 04-21-2011, 09:44 PM   #12
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I did spareribs today on the rotiss. It went for about 4 hours @ about 275 on a basket of charcoal. A clay potting saucer is covered in foil for easy cleanup. The saucer shields the direct heat and provides thermal mass for steady temps.
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Old 10-28-2013, 12:38 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Looks great! Tri-tip is simply not available here in the East.
Our local Costco has them year round. They also sell butter in the one pound western style square. I also occasionally see them in the grocery store.

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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I remember seeing a guide on how to slice a tri-tip for serving. It may have had something about dividing it as well. I don't remember.

I think I googled how to cook a tri-tip or similar.
It is sliced exactly how you would slice a London Broil. Across the grain.
You cook it like London Broil too. Rare or medium rare, over or under direct high heat.

Its very good, but a bit pricey here. I think its in the $7 a pound price range. Similar to steak prices.
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Old 10-28-2013, 01:10 PM   #14
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...It is sliced exactly how you would slice a London Broil. Across the grain...
Yes, of course across the grain. The diagram I saw showed that a tri-tip has different grain directions from section to section so you can't just slice a bunch of slices all in one direction.

Check out this video:
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