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Old 08-22-2017, 01:46 AM   #51
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I love purslane, I hate to see it being weeded from gardens.

- Wild garlic - you will find them when you are engulfed by the smell of onion, very prolific, you can pick them in the spring, pick the ramps and then pick the heads mid-summer when they go to seed (like tiny onion/garlic pebbles), then pick them in the fall and it's like a small bulb of garlic
- Fiddleheads - spring
- Berries - serviceberries, blueberries, raspberries, gooseberries - different types grow all the way through to mid-summer
- Mushrooms - this one is trickier but there are a few easy types with no poisonous lookalikes (like anything, you don't eat it unless 150% certain it's been properly identified)
- Apples - Unbelievably many areas have apples all over the place... look to places where there once was a farm, or where people lived in the past - these are feral apples that were planted and forgotten long ago
- Other greens - so many greens, dandelion, nettle
- Nuts - sweet acorns, hickory, walnuts (stay away from black walnuts, not worth it)
- Flowers - so many things make great teas, you can also forage for your beverages
- Cattails
- Ground cherries (they look like tiny tomatillos but they are orange when ripe)
- Asparagus - looks like regular asparagus but thinner
- Ramps - rare and hard to find, but if you do be responsible and only pick a small percentage, they are being overpicked and this is why they are becoming harder to find

Those are some easy ones. It's honestly so rewarding and fun, not to mention money-saving, to forage for at least some of your foods.
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Old 08-23-2017, 02:46 PM   #52
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I love foraging around here, berries, apples, muscadines, mushrooms, pears, cherries, purslane, poke weed (not recommended unless you are 1000% sure you know how to make Poke Sallit - it is very toxic raw.)

I can also find kudzu taters, wild rose hips, wild persimmons (very sour but good for jam or syrup.) Pecans, fiddle heads, cat tails, a few ramps, acorns, hickory nuts galore - all over my yard in the fall. Of course dandelion and nettle.

Add those to my hunting and fishing and, even if I didn't have a garden or grocery store, I'd eat well.

There is a whole bounty of foods out there that so few care to go get today.
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Old 05-15-2018, 01:28 PM   #53
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We don't forage a lot but we've been hiking all spring, at least 5 days a week. We've been foraging watercress weekly now, and yesterday we ran into some oyster mushrooms, and picked those today. What a treat!
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Old 05-16-2018, 04:27 PM   #54
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We found asparagus today and grabbed them. The mushrooms are still growing, more next week.
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Old 05-16-2018, 05:24 PM   #55
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Blissful, sounds like a good way to combine exercise and foraging. Great finds.
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Old 05-16-2018, 05:49 PM   #56
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taxlady, better than the loss leaders at the grocery store. I can imagine what it was like when this area was just populating, in the 1880's or 1900's, fresh spring water, free watercress salad, mushrooms, and asparagus. There are nettles, m. stellatum and racemosa for medicine, deer, woodchucks, squirrel, rabbits and frogs. They had cranberry bogs, a marl plant, built a hotel, a fish hatchery, bustling with people living off the land. The history of this area is amazing and the more often we go the more we learn.
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Old 06-05-2018, 04:38 PM   #57
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The grape leaves are about ready to pick, young and tender. Time for some grape leaves stuffed.
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Old 06-05-2018, 08:58 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
The grape leaves are about ready to pick, young and tender. Time for some grape leaves stuffed.
Thank you for the heads up.
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Old 06-05-2018, 09:18 PM   #59
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Thank you for the heads up.
You're welcome and thanks for the flowers too!



I've canned grape leaves, about 40, sometimes 72 per jar, washed stacked leaves, stems removed, kind of folded stacks into the jar, then canned like pickles, in a vinegar/salt/water brine, then water bath canned them. They keep well and they are less expensive than the store bought. If I can muster the energy I'd like to can 8 jars for us for the next year or so. Umm 320 to 500+ leaves ought to do it.



I have pressure cooking dried beans on my agenda, and there are a few more things to plant in the gardens.



Dh and I hike everyday for a while- an hour or so. I might be able to enlist him into helping me pick nice grape leaves. I hope. I might be able to squeeze that in.


ANOTHER thing, right now, the oregano is fresh and tender, if you have a patch or know of one, you know they spread easily. So tonight we cut about 3 square feet of it out, a grocery bag full and since it was freshly hosed down with a sprayer, I put it directly in the dehydrator, so I don't have to buy the stuff. I like lemon/oregano on meat, and oregano in curry.



I'll worry about crushing the oregano once it is dry and getting it into jars for this year.
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Old 06-05-2018, 09:56 PM   #60
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Canning them seems like a good idea if they are for dolmas. I want some for pickling. I have read that they help cucumbers stay crispy when you pickle them. I figure I will freeze them. I don't have the energy to make dolmas, so I will just need a few for the cucumber pickles. I think you need one or two per jar.
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