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Old 06-09-2007, 12:41 PM   #1
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Anyone ever done a prime rib?

has anyone ever smoked a prime rib ..
how did it turn out ?
i want to make one soon .. but dont want to ruin
a 40-60$ peice of meat ..

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Old 06-09-2007, 12:46 PM   #2
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My answer would be...sort of.

I've thrown a prime rib on the rotisserie and cooked it on the grill while pumping the smoker box with cherry wood...turned out really well.

But as for cooking it at 200 degrees in pure smoke? Haven't attempted it. Beyond the fact that I'd be dubious of the results, prime rib is such a rich flavored cut of meat it doesn't need much help, and I would doubt the smoke flavor would permeate very deeply into the roast, regardless.
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Old 06-09-2007, 01:34 PM   #3
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Yes, and it was good. Well, it was GREAT, imo. Larded the outer layer with rosemary and smoked over apple wood and a little hickory.
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Old 06-09-2007, 02:04 PM   #4
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Rib Roast...Allow 1 rib per person. Bring it to room temerature! Season it with salt, pepper, and what ever makes you happy! You can oil it first if you want to. Fire up your grill to 700*-800*+ When the grill is ready place the roast on the hot grill. In about 3-5 minutes side one will be seared. Turn it over. Sear side two 3-5 minutes. Then move the roast to a quite, (cooler) area of the grill. If you can control you cooker's internal temperature shoot for about 350* Using a thermometer check in the thickest part of the rib roast. You are looking for about 140* Allow it to cool for 10 minutes before carving and...

Enjoy!
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Old 06-09-2007, 04:14 PM   #5
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thanks for the responses ....
think i am going to try it ...
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Old 06-09-2007, 08:39 PM   #6
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I do smoke them often, technique very much like Uncle Bob's.

The main things is the pit temp will give you the finish you want. the higher the pit temp during the cook will give you a good crust and a rare center. A pit temp in the 250 range will give you the same finish throughout the roast.

I pull the roast at 127 to 130 internal for a med rare finish.

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Old 06-10-2007, 10:34 AM   #7
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I've only made a PR once but basically followed the recipe here: Cooking For Engineers - Recipe File: Prime Rib or Standing Rib Roast

(being a former engineer and all). Anyhow, I politely disagree with Uncle Bob - the 350o temp sounds like a recipe for an over done perimiter on the roast. Roasting at 200~225 gives a very even med-rare throughout the whole piece.

I definitely want to try a standing rib roast on my egg and will basically do this same technique just adding a bit of wood and perhaps searing at the end (very briefly though) or possibly in a skillet.
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Old 06-10-2007, 11:48 AM   #8
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Due to the design of many cookers, (both high end and low end) by placing the temperature gauge high on the cooking chamber door (for ease of reading by the consumer) and the exhaust entrance even higher There is a tendency to get false readings of 50* to 100*+ higher than the actual temperature at the grill surface due to the fact that heat rises. Unless you are measuring the temperature at the grill surface these false reading must be taken into account when cooking on this type of cooker. One high end cooker that I know of has the Temperature gauge as high as possible and about 8 inches from the exhaust entrance gving false readings of 150* higher than grill surface temperatures. I am still waiting on an answer as to why from them! So if you are measuring temperatures at the grill surface then 250* or so would be appropriate. If not, then guage placement and quality should be taken into consideration.
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Old 06-10-2007, 11:52 AM   #9
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My parents gave me a rib roast as a gift once. All I did was give it some basic seasoning on the outside, because I love the natural flavor of the meat. I slow roasted it in the oven, for a very long time. The meat came out juicy and delicious, but I didn't get to enjoy it that much because there was a monstrous vein of fat in the middle of the meat, which I discovered only after cutting the finished roast.
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Old 06-11-2007, 10:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
One high end cooker that I know of has the Temperature gauge as high as possible and about 8 inches from the exhaust entrance gving false readings of 150* higher than grill surface temperatures.
The egg has this issue too, although I don't think it's 150* (like the * trick BTW) difference, at least not when using a plate setter to do indirect cooking such as you would when doing a prime rib- it's closer to 25* difference.

When doing high heat direct cooks, the "dome temp" is less relevant.
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