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Old 06-20-2005, 06:33 PM   #11
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My husband does a tasty smoked pork butt. He just rubs it with Bayou Blast and slathers ordinary mustard all over the outside. He has one of those barrel smokers, and spends all day at it. (250-275 degrees, at least 1-1/2 hours per lb.) When he has the smoker going, he usually does 2 pork butts and a couple of turkeys (those we just rub with olive oil and either Bayou Blast or sage/salt/pepper inside and out).
We generally have company when he does that, so a lot of it gets eaten, but nothing goes to waste.
I freeze small packages of the pulled pork and smoked turkey to put in with beans (soup, green or baked), mix with BBQ sauce for sandwiches, or use for burritos.
Then I boil the turkey carcasses...makes great broth for a gumbo, or any soup for that matter.
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Old 06-20-2005, 06:39 PM   #12
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Oh, one more thing I forgot...how hot should I try to keep my smoker???? I pulled a recipe off of recipezaar that says an oven temp of 250-275. Just wanted to see if that number changes when cooking outdoor.
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Old 06-20-2005, 10:42 PM   #13
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Just remember your cooker is just an outdoor oven. Sure you can! It make just be a little more work to keep a steady temp, depending on the outdoor elements of the day. If you have trouble keeping it where you want it, you may have to adjust the cooking time.

We take recipes I find in cookbooks for cooking things in an oven, and convert them to cooking outside. We practice cooking it, storing, etc for competitions.

Pilgrims cooked in wood fired ovens.

There is just something about eating food cooked outdoors.

Keep practicing, asking questions, trying the different ways of doing it.

It really is best when you just keep it simple.
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Old 06-20-2005, 10:45 PM   #14
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Also, try to learn your hot and cold spots of your cooker.

An easy and inexpensive way to do that is to test the cooker with can biscuits.

Water in the water pan can also help you control the temps.
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Old 06-25-2005, 05:12 PM   #15
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This might sound like a dumb question, but why do you cook the pork until about 200 degress? I have seen other recipes say approx. the same temp. Doesn't pork become fully cooked at like 160 or 170 (forgot which one). Wouldn't the pork get dried out (even if I do spray every hour w/ mop sauce)?? Or does the temp change since we're slow cooking stuff?

Oh, my Dad got me a pork butt, but it's boneless, so the cooking time should be a lot less. No pulling an all nighter!

The meat has been on the grill since 7am this morning and is at a temp of about 150 now...soon...
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Old 06-25-2005, 05:17 PM   #16
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The pork won't be "pullable" at 160 degrees. You would be able to slice it but that's all. No, it does not dry out at all. It tends to be dryer at 160 degrees. Cook fat side up for most of the way then turn over. I don't know that the cooking time would be that much less even if boneless. Rainee would know for sure.

I don't even use a mop - I just leave mine alone for about 10 hours. At about 200 degrees internal temp it starts pulling apart and is wonderful!
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Old 06-25-2005, 05:44 PM   #17
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Ok, thanks! I've tried as hard as I can to leave it alone, I did panick a few times when the cooking temp in the smoker showed that it dropped below 200 deg. I added more coals to get the temp back up to about 225. This has been interesting trying to get the temp to remain consistent.
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Old 06-25-2005, 05:49 PM   #18
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I cheat - I have an electric smoker - it has spoiled me - I feel like Ron Popeil - set it and forget it!!!!
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Old 06-25-2005, 05:53 PM   #19
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I had access to an electric smoker for a while, but when I read a thread that said I would still have to cook it because the meat wouldn't reach the correct internal temp, I just gave up and never used it. Seemed like too much work and I guess I just didn't get it!
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Old 06-25-2005, 08:52 PM   #20
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We don't have any experience cooking a boneless butt. However, it is the fat that you are trying to render. So you may need to allow just as much time. Better to have it done early and hold it, than it not be ready to eat when you are.
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