"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > BBQ & Smokin' Meats
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-13-2006, 11:21 AM   #1
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
Chestnut wood

Hello,
I'm taking down a chesnut tree today for my Dad and was wondering if the wood would be any good for smoking. I usually use hickory or cherry because it grows out back and I really like the taste. Has anyone here tried chesnut?
John.

__________________

__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2006, 02:47 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
I've never used it, but one of the BBQ sites lists it as a wood suitable for smoking. No real description of it though...

http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/8.html

John
__________________

__________________

ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2006, 05:34 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
Hello John,
I did a search also and came up with the same result. I was just hoping that someone on DC had tried it and could make some recommendations. I just cut the tree down today, so I'll cut some up into chunks to let them dry out in the garage. When dry, I'll try it with chicken in the smoker. At 69 cents a lb. for chicken, I can't loose too much if I don't like the taste.
Thank you for the reply,
John.
__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 09:40 AM   #4
Senior Cook
 
jminion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Federal Way, WA
Posts: 114
John
Burn some and smell it, if you like what you smell chances are you like it on food. Trees that produce fruit or nuts can be used. I would go light so you can get a feel for the strenght of the smoke.
Jim
__________________
jminion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 11:49 AM   #5
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
That's a good suggestion, I'll try it. (sure beats ruining a chicken)
Thanks Jim.
__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2006, 09:11 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 496
Chestnut's a decent wood to smoke with, but not really on its own (at least for me). It's a little "too" sweet. Mix it with something like mesquite or (great if you can find it) lemon or walnut. Chestnut doesn't really go too well with chicken, in my opinion...works well with game meats though.
__________________
Poppinfresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2006, 10:42 PM   #7
Senior Cook
 
240brickman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 109
Send a message via AIM to 240brickman Send a message via Yahoo to 240brickman
Hi, JohnL!

I consider myself to be a (fairly) serious griller/smoker, but I've never used chestnut wood as a smoking medium. It's a hardwood/nut-producing tree, so it should qualify as a viable option for smoking, but I couldn't tell ya how the food would turn out. I certainly agree that if you burn a small amount if it, and it smells acceptable to you, then it ought to produce an acceptable "end product" if you smoke with it.

Since your chestnut tree is freshly cut, you might want to immediately sample the smoke properties (rather than waiting anywhere from 6 months to 2 years for the wood to fully cure). If you have an electric bandsaw, or a circular saw, just cut up a couple of larger pieces into little chunks....and save the sawdust. You can dry out the sawdust in just a day or two; then smoke a small amount of food with it. That'll be an accurate "preview" of how the wood will behave.

Here's a helpful site (usually) that I've relied on for ages. They don't have that much to say about chestnut, however!


http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/8.html



--J
__________________
Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work--Aristotle




http://show.imagehosting.us/show/103...75_1037746.jpg
240brickman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2006, 06:51 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
Hi there P-fresh,
Thanks for the input. I haven't tried to smoke with it yet, so I really don't know how it will taste on it's own. I'm located on the mid-east coast, so lemon wood is out of the question and the only walnut that we have here is black walnut which is pretty intense. We can however purchase mesquite. I think I'll try the chestnut on it's own though before I try to mix it, so I can get a true flavor of the smoke. You mentioned that you thought that it was sweet. Do think that it would work as a light smoke with seafood such as scallops or mild fish such as flounder?
Thanks'
John
__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2006, 07:02 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
Hello there brick,
I've never tried to smoke with green wood before.
I always thought that it had to be dried to develope the flavor. (go's to show you what I know) It makes sense that the saw dust would dry out before the chunks or slices. If not full flavor, it should surely give a hint of whats to come!
John
__________________

__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.