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Old 01-04-2015, 08:18 PM   #21
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Nice nice, Paymaster! I would happily eat it!
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Old 01-05-2015, 10:23 AM   #22
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I have had smoke rib roast, I haven't done it myself and I personally like my recipe better than the smoked I had. I figure if you want smoke flavor and the meat is fatty and not going to benefit much by slow smoking it, get liquid smoke...

I think people try to complicate even the simple, one of the attractions to a rib roast is the ease of it...

I buy them from a local butcher, $5.10 per lb for choice {have to buy the hole thing, normally 18 lbs ish}... I trim the fat, cut it off the bone, tie it {1 1/4" spaces and around the endcuts, I know a lot of people don't tie it around but I have been doing it so long its just muscle memory at this point}, I then salt and pepper the bone, coat the entire tied rib with lipton onion soup mix, and then tie it back to the bone...

A room temperature rib goes in the oven prepped in about the time it takes for the oven to pre heat to 475, I cook it at 475 for 15-20 minutes, then lower it to 315. I pull it when its at 120, cover it with a towel for about 45 minutes, cut the ties so it falls off the bone then trim like a boneless roast...

I will only cook prime rib if I am doing a large piece, if I am cooking a small roast just for me and the kids, I will get a nice boneless strip roast for $1 more a lb, its a no brainer, cook it almost the same way with the lipton soup mix and temperature wise...

Anyway sorry for the long post, got a little off topic there, I can live with out smoked rib roasts, now brisket, shoulder clod, and any pork cut on the other hand, smoke and be happy...
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Old 01-05-2015, 10:53 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Cooking4to View Post
... I figure if you want smoke flavor and the meat is fatty and not going to benefit much by slow smoking it...

...brisket, shoulder clod, and any pork cut on the other hand, smoke and be happy...

Plenty of fat on brisket and pork butt/shoulder. They do well low and slow smoked.
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Old 01-05-2015, 11:59 AM   #24
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Plenty of fat on brisket and pork butt/shoulder. They do well low and slow smoked.
I may have worded that wrong, I meant the meat is fatty, like infused better, easier to cook, with brisket and shoulder the fat is on the outside or in big tracks throughout, with the rib it seems to be throughout the cut, so cooking it super slow after its sealed up doesn't make a big difference, where if you cook a brisket fast, it will be like chewing on my boot... {fast is also the wrong word, I am talking 300-350}...
I always figured the cheaper cuts needed to be slow smoked, rubbed, and sang to and the good cuts could be cooked by a monkey with a cigarette lighter and still be edible... You either pay for the meat with money or get a cheap piece and pay with labor and time...

I have a nice piece of meat I bought at the butchers Saturday, its a part off the shoulder he had marked $1.19 lb!!! Its soaking right now, I am going to mix a rub, tenderize it a bit, and hick smoke it at the serving temperature until its cooked through {could take a day, lol} and it will come delicious and be worth every second it takes... Now if I just cut that into a steak and threw it on a smoking skillet, flipped it after 3 minutes and covered it with onions, like I would do with a rib or strip and it would be about good enough for my dog, but a rib or strip will cost me $10+ a lb {gets expensive when you buy small cuts}...

So anyway, sorry about that, I was insinuating good marbling with better cuts of meat, so they are easier to cook and remain edible...
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Old 01-05-2015, 12:10 PM   #25
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Got it. Well marbled vs. fatty.

Was it pork shoulder you got for $1.19? Smoking will be tough in the extra cold temps we're expecting this week.
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Old 01-05-2015, 01:34 PM   #26
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Got it. Well marbled vs. fatty.

Was it pork shoulder you got for $1.19? Smoking will be tough in the extra cold temps we're expecting this week.
Yeah, especially if it requires regular attention. Just put the Christmas trappings away in the garage, and it was COLD. I couldn't even consider doing any low and slow right now... grilling yes, but barbecue, not so much.
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Old 01-05-2015, 01:48 PM   #27
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Got it. Well marbled vs. fatty.

Was it pork shoulder you got for $1.19? Smoking will be tough in the extra cold temps we're expecting this week.
Beef shoulder clod... I smoke in the garage, and its heated I know shoulder roasts are tough business, but depending on the meat, if you do it right they come out tender and tasty.
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Old 01-08-2015, 01:30 PM   #28
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No, I run the cable out the lid opening. The gasket seals around it fine.
The roast was cooked the way the most squeamish of the diners, my daughter, likes it cooked. I would have preferred more rare as well.
So you squash the cable between the lid and the kettle?
I know its armored cable, but I don't think that's what they had in mind when they (manufacturer) chose sensor cable. Or is that how they recommend you use it?

Are you not concerned you will ruin this cable? If you pinch it hard enough you will have what is called a cold joint.
A cold joint is where the wires are touching each other. Its measuring the temp at the exact spot the individual wires contained in the cable are in contact with each other. Not at the sensor anymore.
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Old 01-08-2015, 01:57 PM   #29
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So you squash the cable between the lid and the kettle?
I know its armored cable, but I don't think that's what they had in mind when they (manufacturer) chose sensor cable. Or is that how they recommend you use it?

Are you not concerned you will ruin this cable? If you pinch it hard enough you will have what is called a cold joint.
A cold joint is where the wires are touching each other. Its measuring the temp at the exact spot the individual wires contained in the cable are in contact with each other. Not at the sensor anymore.
There is enough give in the gasket material used, that there is no crimp , bend or kink. Smoke rarely leaks where the cable come through either.
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Old 01-08-2015, 03:09 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
So you squash the cable between the lid and the kettle?
I know its armored cable, but I don't think that's what they had in mind when they (manufacturer) chose sensor cable. Or is that how they recommend you use it?

Are you not concerned you will ruin this cable? If you pinch it hard enough you will have what is called a cold joint.
A cold joint is where the wires are touching each other. Its measuring the temp at the exact spot the individual wires contained in the cable are in contact with each other. Not at the sensor anymore.
Doesn't the probe thermometer work by measuring the current through a thermistor in the end of the probe? That was my understanding. If there was a short between the wires, where the wire was pinched, you would get max current flow, renduring the temperature gauge useless. But it would not be measuring the thermistor regulated current at all. In either case though, the temperature from a shorted cable would not be accurate at all.

The other possible scenario of a pinched cable would be wire broken inside the insulation, resulting in an open, with no current flow at all, again rendering the temperature gauge useless.

With my Webber Kettle, I have ruined a couple of digital probe thermometers by pinching the cable with the lid. Glad that doesn't happen on your gear, Paymaster.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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