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Old 07-28-2008, 08:43 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by redgriller View Post
Be careful how long you cook a rib though. You can cook them so long that the meat literally falls off the bone with a shake of your wrist. That makes it pulled pork with bones and not ribs!

Sounds like you're getting along though. Great job.
I think the length of time was my problem all along. I was cooking them for 4 hours and they were coming out very dry and tough. On this attempt i think I took them off a tad too soon or didn't have the temp quite high enough. In my case the longer I left them on the more dried out they became.

Next time I may bump temp up to 265 or so and wrap for the middle hour in foil. Sauce them and finish off for 30 min unwrapped.
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Old 08-10-2008, 09:59 PM   #32
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Do you remove the membrane before cooking the baby backs? Failing to do this can cause them to be tough.
I don't use my gas grill for smoking, I'll use my bullet smoker or offset smoker for this purpose. I cook my baby backs in the bullet smoker for 5 to 5.5 hours. I try to keep the temp in the 200 to 225 range. I will use apple or pecan wood for baby backs.
I prep them with my own rub and will place strips of maple bacon on the slabs. I don't wrap them in foil or plastic during the cooking process. The bullet smoker has a water pan to distribute the heat and add moisture to the meat. I do spray them with apple juice as they are cooking, after 2 hours then every hour. I let the ribs rest about 15 minutes before cutting them apart.
Always keep practicing your technique, because the results are very tasty.
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Old 08-18-2008, 10:17 AM   #33
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Just found this forum and am looking for some help. I've been cooking baby back ribs on a weber gas grill for the last few months. I get the temp up to about 200 degrees. I light the left most burner only and cook ribs on right side of grill away from heat (indirect). I use hickory wood chips in the smoker box and let cook for about 4 hours. The meat seems to shrink back from the bone but I've been finding the meat kinda tough. Are they over cooked or undercooked? I thought over-cooked ribs yielded meat that literally fell off the bone. I seem to have the opposite problem. Could they possibly need to cook longer? these are not huge baby back ribs. They don't taste bad it's just after 4 hours I would expect the meat to be very tender. What do you thinK? should i go longer or shorter?
Cook at 225-250. Pick the rack up with the tongs like in the pic. When the rack starts to seperate, they're done. Some chew to the meat with a clean bone. My baste is equal parts apple juice and apple cider vinegar with 1/4 part dark brown sugar. I just mix it up in a 2 cup measuring cup and pour some on every 30 minutes. Mops and brushes tend to remove rubs and spices. Spray bottles work great if you have multiple cuts going at once.

I add my sauce once I see them seperate the slightest bit. It seems the time it takes to finish from that point on is good time for the sauce to cook.

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Old 08-18-2008, 01:54 PM   #34
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My baste is equal parts apple juice and apple cider with 1/4 part dark brown sugar. I just mix it up in a 2 cup measuring cup and pour some on every 30 minutes.
Jeekinz - did you mean equal parts of apple juice and apple cider vinegar?
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Old 08-18-2008, 01:59 PM   #35
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Jeekinz - did you mean equal parts of apple juice and apple cider vinegar?
oops....brb.
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Old 08-26-2008, 12:27 AM   #36
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Want to know my Hot wing tips.....
Sure,give us your hot wing tips-knowledge IS power after all....

I've been doing some thinking about hot wings lately and come to a couple of conclusions.

1. The cooking method is wrong. Or at the very least, too separated.

2. Hot Wing sauce should be more than just hot sauce and butter.

3. There is one element that is missing in current Hot Wings that will push the next generation of Hot Wings into the future. I absolutely believe that this one element is not in play anywhere in these United States.
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Old 10-09-2008, 09:19 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by cg1200 View Post
Just found this forum and am looking for some help. I've been cooking baby back ribs on a weber gas grill for the last few months. I get the temp up to about 200 degrees. I light the left most burner only and cook ribs on right side of grill away from heat (indirect). I use hickory wood chips in the smoker box and let cook for about 4 hours. The meat seems to shrink back from the bone but I've been finding the meat kinda tough. Are they over cooked or undercooked? I thought over-cooked ribs yielded meat that literally fell off the bone. I seem to have the opposite problem. Could they possibly need to cook longer? these are not huge baby back ribs. They don't taste bad it's just after 4 hours I would expect the meat to be very tender. What do you thinK? should i go longer or shorter?

I know this is an older thread and I am also new here. I myself use my Weber Genesis to cook ribs using indirect medium. The ribs are done when the meat starts to seperate from the bone...you will see the tips of the bones exposed 1/2" or so. Pick up the Weber Cookbook for Grilling and it will give you alot of hints and also great recipes.

As another posted said DO remove the membrane from the back of the ribs...nobody like to eat that once cooked.
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Old 10-15-2008, 09:52 PM   #38
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I know this is an older thread and I am also new here. I myself use my Weber Genesis to cook ribs using indirect medium. The ribs are done when the meat starts to seperate from the bone...you will see the tips of the bones exposed 1/2" or so. Pick up the Weber Cookbook for Grilling and it will give you alot of hints and also great recipes.

As another posted said DO remove the membrane from the back of the ribs...nobody like to eat that once cooked.
Been a while since I started this thread. Can't believe people are still posting to it! Anyway - I always remove membrane. Sometimes it's a pain in the @ss but I usually get it off completely.

Check this out. I was preparing to grill some ribs a few weeks ago but the weather turned awful before I started so I decided to try and cook them in my kitchen oven. I know, it's heresy but I've seen Bobby Flay do it and others as well so I figured what the hell? Better than getting soaked all afternoon.

I set the temp to 260 put the ribs on a broiler pan and filled the bottom part with water figuring it would create steam and keep the ribs moist. I let them cook for about an hour and basted with Worcestershire and olive oil. Let them cook another hour and re-basted. At this point they looked great. I was optimistic they might be ok. I flipped them for 20 min and then flipped back and put on BBQ sauce for another 20 min.

They were the best ribs I've ever made. The meat was so tender and moist it practically fell off the bone. The texture was perfect and it even looked like BBQ ribs. I was so stunned. I didn't think it was possible to do this in a regular oven. Total cooking time was about 2 hours and 40 minutes. At the same time I was now puzzled as to why my grill attempts have never even come close to achieving this level of tenderness.

So what I've learned from this is my Weber (Summit 450) thermometer may be off. I cook at the same temp on the grill but they have never been this moist and tender. I'm wondering if its hotter in there than its showing on the gauge. I also think the water pan beneath the ribs helped a lot in keeping the ribs moist. I could tell when I went to baste that the ribs just looked moist and I could see the bones becoming more exposed on the end. I also might be adding too much smoke which might be drying them out too.

Pretty interesting. I'm tempted to just keep cooking them in the oven and then finishing on the grill but that seems like cheating.
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Old 10-16-2008, 06:49 AM   #39
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Been a while since I started this thread. Can't believe people are still posting to it! Anyway - I always remove membrane. Sometimes it's a pain in the @ss but I usually get it off completely.

Check this out. I was preparing to grill some ribs a few weeks ago but the weather turned awful before I started so I decided to try and cook them in my kitchen oven. I know, it's heresy but I've seen Bobby Flay do it and others as well so I figured what the hell? Better than getting soaked all afternoon.

I set the temp to 260 put the ribs on a broiler pan and filled the bottom part with water figuring it would create steam and keep the ribs moist. I let them cook for about an hour and basted with Worcestershire and olive oil. Let them cook another hour and re-basted. At this point they looked great. I was optimistic they might be ok. I flipped them for 20 min and then flipped back and put on BBQ sauce for another 20 min.

They were the best ribs I've ever made. The meat was so tender and moist it practically fell off the bone. The texture was perfect and it even looked like BBQ ribs. I was so stunned. I didn't think it was possible to do this in a regular oven. Total cooking time was about 2 hours and 40 minutes. At the same time I was now puzzled as to why my grill attempts have never even come close to achieving this level of tenderness.

So what I've learned from this is my Weber (Summit 450) thermometer may be off. I cook at the same temp on the grill but they have never been this moist and tender. I'm wondering if its hotter in there than its showing on the gauge. I also think the water pan beneath the ribs helped a lot in keeping the ribs moist. I could tell when I went to baste that the ribs just looked moist and I could see the bones becoming more exposed on the end. I also might be adding too much smoke which might be drying them out too.

Pretty interesting. I'm tempted to just keep cooking them in the oven and then finishing on the grill but that seems like cheating.
Try one more time on your Weber, if 3 burner you might try turning off the center burner and just using the 2 outers. I have done several racks of baby backs and they all came out great, if fact my parents said they were the best ribs they have ever tasted.

Your oven idea is exactly how a smoker works (water pan). You may try that with your Weber...you can also parboil the ribs prior to finishing them on the grill. You might also get another thermometer and check your Weber temp.

See Stevens site for an awesome book and several ideas on how to grill.

barbecuebible(dot)com
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Old 10-16-2008, 10:25 PM   #40
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Try one more time on your Weber, if 3 burner you might try turning off the center burner and just using the 2 outers. I have done several racks of baby backs and they all came out great, if fact my parents said they were the best ribs they have ever tasted.

Your oven idea is exactly how a smoker works (water pan). You may try that with your Weber...you can also parboil the ribs prior to finishing them on the grill. You might also get another thermometer and check your Weber temp.

See Stevens site for an awesome book and several ideas on how to grill.

barbecuebible(dot)com
I will definitely give the grill another shot. I feel good about what I've learned and look forward to my next attempt. I will definitely figure out some way to get a water pan beneath the ribs. This seems vital. I'll also try lowering the temp to maybe 225. I may have to prop the lid open to achieve that temp. The weber tends to run pretty hot.

I have a 4 burner grill and usually only use the far left burner and place the ribs on the far right. I sometimes have to light the smoker burner to get the wood chips to burn but turn it off as soon as it starts to smoke.
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