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Old 10-20-2008, 09:36 AM   #51
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Dry ribs means the temp is too high. Over cooked at 225 means mushy meat, not dry.
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Old 10-20-2008, 10:40 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
There's grates in the oven too. lol
That's an interesting point.
I suppose you could lay the ribs directly on the oven grates
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Old 10-20-2008, 10:50 AM   #53
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You make a good point but I don't entirely agree. I obviously can't add smoke to the ribs when I cook them in the oven and during the summer months I'd prefer to cook outside and not have my oven on for 3 hours heating up my house.

Have you tried adding a pie tin of water and liquid smoke? Cheating, but it works

I cook steaks in the oven and on the grill and there is no comparison. The grilled steaks are 10x better. Same for chicken, fish just about everything. This is the first time I've ever cooked anything in the oven that I preferred to the grilled equivalent.

I think there is no comparison, too, but there are many here who favor a pan seared/stick in the oven steak. I'd just as soon throw mine on teh grill like you.

In the end I would like to enjoy moist, tender ribs on either the grill or from the oven. I think I've figured out the oven method but my grill technique needs work (as you say). The smoke seems like it might be drying them out somewhat. I baste too every 30 minutes.

Follow jminion's advice. I've done them this way and they are definitely moist, but they are still different than oven cooked.

Adding a water pan is tricky because there isn't much clearance between the flavor bars and the cooking grates. Still I think it is worth a try. Others have said they wrap their ribs in foil part way through the cooking time. I suppose I could try this too but it would prevent the smoke.

Again, refer to jminion's post. They pick up the smoke in the beginning, before you wrap them. And from what I've read on the "smoke" forums, after the meat reaches 140 it's about as smoked as it's going to get.

Trial and error, practice makes perfect.
I'm with ya there! I'm trying to figure out a Weber smoker, or "pit" as they're called

oops, looks like I need to figure out that muliple quote thing.
I'm in red (obviously)
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Old 10-20-2008, 02:06 PM   #54
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pacanis
Here is an explaination of a fireup method for a Weber Smokey Mountain cooker
Firing Up Your Weber Bullet - The Virtual Weber Bullet

With the new formual Kingsford (if that is what you are using) start out with fewer lit coals than is used in fireup explained in the link above.

Jim
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Old 10-20-2008, 02:51 PM   #55
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Thanks Jim.
I was going to use that method (been all over that site), but someone on another forum tweaked it a bit and I followed how he fires up his WSM. I think it was a charcoal problem, Wicked Good lump brand. I just looked in and there's a bunch that I added later not ignited and it looks like the other stuff just stopped burning.... How does that happen with vents open.... lousy stuff.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled thread (lol)
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Old 10-20-2008, 09:42 PM   #56
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Wicked good is good charcoal, it may have been that there was very little fire left and it did not lite the charcoal you added.
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Old 10-21-2008, 06:52 AM   #57
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It is? Maybe I need to practice with charcoal first, something a lot more uniform. It certainly lit quickly, I'll give it that.
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Old 10-21-2008, 09:31 AM   #58
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It is? Maybe I need to practice with charcoal first, something a lot more uniform. It certainly lit quickly, I'll give it that.
Briquettes should be started seperately in a chimney before adding them to the cooker. You can throw lump directly on the fire inside the cooker but it needs to still be somewhat hot. Otherwise it won't catch.
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Old 10-21-2008, 10:19 AM   #59
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Dry ribs means the temp is too high. Over cooked at 225 means mushy meat, not dry.
That's interesting, so overcooking at a lower temp is different than over cooked at a higher temp.

I cook ribs at 260 to 275 and if they get over cooked it just happens sooner than if I cooked at 225 but they would still be over cooked.
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Old 10-21-2008, 10:26 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
Briquettes should be started seperately in a chimney before adding them to the cooker. You can throw lump directly on the fire inside the cooker but it needs to still be somewhat hot. Otherwise it won't catch.
There's this method called the minion method where you have unlit charcoal in the ring. The lit chimney full you dump in and spread around is supposed to ignite the unlit, thereby giving you a longer burn time without having to add anything. From what I've "read", it works with either lump or briquettes. And it seemed to work for me, it just did not give me the length ot burn time I was expecting.
Granted, this is all just "book learning" at this stage of the game
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