"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > BBQ & Smokin' Meats
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-20-2006, 01:35 PM   #21
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crestman
Finally have my internet back.

Thanks for all the replies!!

I'm going to have to hope this will be enough. I am serving it with cob corn and some roasted potatoes.

I do have another question though. I put the butt on at 6:30 this am. I have a grill temp at 220deg and my internal temp of the butt is already at 115deg. That's only 2 hours!!!...I was planning on a 11 hours or so. At this rate, it will be done by 11:00 this morning!!!....Should I take it off around 180deg and then put it back on an hour before we want to eat? I'm going to be pulling it so I want 205. Why is this thing cooking so fast?

Thanks

Keith
Don't bother taking the temp of the pork. It isn't cooking fast--it just has to come up to temp after all.
Keep the temp of the grill exactly where it is. It will be done after 8-10 hours. The temp eventually levels out. What has to happen is for the temperature to remain in the 170-180* range long enough to breack down the collagenous fibers of this tough cut of meat.
You will be fine.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 02:18 PM   #22
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
Surely you do serve it au naturel without BBQ sauce until it reaches the table. That would be the true Carolina way of serving pulled pork.
And being in western NC when I serve it (often, as sort of a specialty of mine) I have to serve at least two sauces--Eastern, which is basically HOT pepper slightly sweetened vinegar, or western--a tomato based sauce that is nothing like KC Masterpiece.
How do you cook your pork, out of curiosity? Smoked, roasted, combo of those, crockpot, pressure cooker?
I'm a smoke-aholic. Along with a nice dry rub, it's the only way to go. There are 4 sauces I serve it with (a hot vinegar based sauce, a habernero pepper sauce, a sweet Carolina honey sauce, and my own barbecue sauce). I inject the pork with a LITTLE bit of the vinegar sauce and periodically baste it with it as well during smoking, usually whenever I'm changing out the wood chips. I use a combination of mostly mesquite wood chips with a little bit of plum or maple wood chips mixed in.
__________________

__________________
Poppinfresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 02:40 PM   #23
Sous Chef
 
Banana Brain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 647
Eating butt? Sounds... hmm. No thanks.
__________________
Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet. -Julia Child
Banana Brain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 03:15 PM   #24
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
I'll just comment once more on the amount. Poppinfresh has posted that he gets a scant 6 servings from an 8# butt and that is certainly his experience and it must be some VERY hearty eaters--the more the better!!.
I also can only speak from my experience in serving a lot of pulled pork--and advising others who have made it and asked about it on a number of other boards.
When I have auctioned off a BBQ for 20+ at charity auctions, I have taken the hosts approximately 1 1/2 7-8# butts, pulled. And of course, all the trimmings. Each year the hosts report leftovers. I have served 30+ for lunch (admittedly) from a bit over an 8# piece with leftovers for the hostesses to take home. I have considered a generous rule of thumb in estimating yield to be 1/2# uncooked weight/adult.
It's good that mr. fresh can make his own however, because if you had to buy that amount retail it would be a BUNCH of money--it sells for about $6/lb. here--and that's with sauce on it!! Hate to pay big money for sauce--that I don't even like.
By the way, Poppinfresh, I recommend my tomato based sauce to you also.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 03:27 PM   #25
Executive Chef
 
Bangbang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 3,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
Personally, I would cook two. That's what I did the last few times I smoked a pork butt last year, as my kids can't get enough of it (we have 5). Plus, I can do other things with the leftovers.
I would smoke two also. I would want plenty of left overs.
__________________
You are not drunk if you can lie on the floor without holding on.
Bangbang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 07:04 PM   #26
Assistant Cook
 
Crestman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Posts: 22
Well, it's now 5:00pm and its sitting at 172deg. It's been around this temp forever. I may have to pull it off early and just slice it as some of my guests need to eat by 6 or so.

Looks good though.

Keith
__________________
Crestman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 07:08 PM   #27
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 64
Pull it! 160 is all you needed.
__________________
ChefScotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 09:11 PM   #28
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 496
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
I'll just comment once more on the amount. Poppinfresh has posted that he gets a scant 6 servings from an 8# butt and that is certainly his experience and it must be some VERY hearty eaters--the more the better!!.
I also can only speak from my experience in serving a lot of pulled pork--and advising others who have made it and asked about it on a number of other boards.
When I have auctioned off a BBQ for 20+ at charity auctions, I have taken the hosts approximately 1 1/2 7-8# butts, pulled. And of course, all the trimmings. Each year the hosts report leftovers. I have served 30+ for lunch (admittedly) from a bit over an 8# piece with leftovers for the hostesses to take home. I have considered a generous rule of thumb in estimating yield to be 1/2# uncooked weight/adult.
It's good that mr. fresh can make his own however, because if you had to buy that amount retail it would be a BUNCH of money--it sells for about $6/lb. here--and that's with sauce on it!! Hate to pay big money for sauce--that I don't even like.
By the way, Poppinfresh, I recommend my tomato based sauce to you also.
Tomato based sauce=my barbecue sauce :P All 4 of them I make myself (I guess it looked a little deceiving the way I wrote it before). I've yet to ever have a BBQ sauce I like better than my own, so I'd be hard pressed to come off it. Personally, I think the Carolina honey sauce is much better on my chicken wings, but to each their own.


As to 1/2# uncooked per person...Ehh, I can't see it. You obviously can't eat the bone, and it does shrink considerably during cooking unless you're doing something evil to the poor thing and water cooking it.
__________________
Poppinfresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 10:19 PM   #29
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
NO, 160 is NOT what you want. The 170 is fine and the meat is probably done to the point of pulling. This is NOT roast pork where 160 is the well done temp. This is a slow braise basically and the temp goes higher and breaks down the collagen--as I have said.
Pop--I have been making this for over 40 years. I am sure yours is good. I am equally sure mine is good--done in the smoker or in the oven, as I do it. Take a look at the recipe. Mine doesn't shrink so much as "collapse". The bone is negligible--maybe you are using an entirely different cut from mine. The bone in mine is about 3-4" long and 1 1/2" wide--with a slight "y" shape. It might weigh 1/4#.

And a quote to perhaps further explain it.

In the book How To Cook Meat, authors Chris Schlesinger and John Willoughby say that tough cuts of meat must be "cooked through doneness to tenderness." In other words, you don't stop cooking a pork butt when it reaches the internal temperature we associate with tender cuts like pork loin or pork tenderloin. A pork butt is not edible if cooked to 140°F or even 170°F.
In order to be tender, a pork butt must be cooked to an internal temperature of 180-205°. The reason for this, according to McGee, is that the conversion of collagen to gelatin doesn't even begin until meat reaches an internal temperature of 140°F, and is most efficient as internal temps approach 212°F. "Low and slow" barbecuing at 225-250°F is ideal to facilitate this conversion, providing gentle heat over many hours, allowing the collagen to make its transition into gelatin. While some moisture will be driven out of the pork butt as it reaches these high internal temps, the gelatin makes up for it and keeps the meat moist.
  • For sliced pork, cook to 180-185°.
  • For pulled pork, cook to 190-205°.
Where To Measure Internal Temperature
A pork butt consists of a number of individual muscles that converge at the shoulder, and there is a lot of fat and connective tissue between these muscles. As a result, you will get different temperature readings between different muscles and between meat and fat or connective tissue.
I feel the best way to measure internal temperature is to check in several locations and average the results. For example, if you're shooting for 195°F and you get readings of 193°F, 195°F, 198°F, and 201°F in different locations, you've achieved your goal of 195°F. If you prefer to measure in just a single location, then measure in the thickest part of the meat.
Temperature Plateau
It's common for a pork butt to reach a temperature plateau of 155-170°F during cooking--a point at which the internal temperature stops rising and stalls, sometimes for several hours. It's thought that this has something to do with the amount of moisture in the meat and the conversion of collagen to gelatin discussed above.
Do not despair, because this is when the meat is starting to "cook through doneness to tenderness." With some patience and a 225-250°F cooker temperature, the pork butt will eventually move beyond the plateau and the meat temperature shall rise again.
If you're cooking a very large pork butt and running short on time (or patience), you can kick the cooker up to 275°F without doing any harm. Or, if the pork butt has reached 160-175°F, you can wrap it in foil and finish it in the cooker or in the oven, like in Pork Butt - Quick Cooked.
Cooking Times
How long will it take to cook pork butt to 180-205°F? As a rough estimate, figure 1-1/2 to 2 hours per pound based on the trimmed weight of an individual roast. For example, when cooking two roasts weighing 8 pounds each after trimming, the total cooking time for both roasts should be 12-16 hours.
Remember, this is only an estimate--it may take more or less time, depending on the thickness of the pork butt, the amount of connective tissue that needs to be converted to gelatin, the temperature of the cooker, weather conditions, and the number of times you open the cooker for turning and basting.
While it may not take much more time to cook multiple pork butts that it does to cook just one, it will require more fuel. Make sure to use more charcoal in the cooker when barbecuing multiple pork butts.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2006, 10:57 PM   #30
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,363
My first pork butt for pulled pork was made following an Emeril recipe which called the meat done when the internal temperature reached 160F. It was not nearly done and we ended up having to resort to chopping rather than pulling as the meat was still intact enough to be sliceable.

Gretchen's info is right on.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.