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Old 06-13-2007, 09:15 AM   #21
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Jeekinz, if you go with the second "feeder" fire to produce wood coals, you can keep the second fire in an older grill, if you have one.
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Old 06-13-2007, 09:15 AM   #22
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Jeekinz….

To your original question, cooking a pork butt, the use of briquettes as I described above refers to indirect heat. Direct heat is grilling, steaks chops, burgers, etc. Indirect heat refers to BBQing the “low and slow” method used for pork shoulders, butts, briskets, and various fowl etc. The off-set cookers are designed for one to build the fire in the fire box. With the remainder of the cooker used a “cooking chamber” If your question also poses can you build your fire inside, and on the right of the cooking chamber and place your meat/fowl on the left side the simple answer is yes. This would qualify as “indirect” cooking. Not what your cooker was primarily engineered for, but would work.
Should you choose to use pure hardwood coals as your heat source, your second fire (to produce coals) can simply be built on the ground inside some type of fire ring, bricks, or concrete blocks etc. (Caution! Do not use stones that possibly could have moisture trapped inside they may explode!!) You would also need to check local fire codes to see if this type of (outside) fire is permissible in your jurisdiction. Not to mention what your sweet wife would think of a burned spot in the back yard. There are also patio fire place “things” that could be used. In the end this method is a lot of hard work. So, again the simplest, easiest method is charcoal + flavoring wood.

Your last question, “Am I familiar with the Minion Method of “grilling”? I am not sure I understand your question. If you are asking me how Jim grills steaks, chops etc. I could only comment by saying he is an excellent, professional, and knowledgeable pit master, and I would not hesitate to eat/enjoy any foods that he grilled/BBQed etc. If your question refers to the Minion Method of fire building/control etc, it is a widely accepted method that enjoys a large following. I have used it with excellent results many times.


Have fun!
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Old 06-13-2007, 10:01 AM   #23
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Thank you for all the great tips. Let's see what happens.
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Old 06-13-2007, 10:58 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FletcherNC
Do what Andy said. Smoke for 4 hours at 225-250* (no higher at any point in the cooking sequence!!) and then finish in the oven. There is plenty of smoke in that amount of time--even too much. Then finish for about 6 hours in the oven at 250* (because the "real" temp in the smoker was probably not all the way up to 250*).
It is easier to do this without all the hassle of keeping a fire going. The end result will be just as good--crusty, brown, succulent.
Be careful not to use an actively burning wood or charcoal. It needs to be embers/coals. Actively burning wood will give off an acrid smoke.
If using wood, start it in another container and shovel in the coals
Too much smoke? Really? How come most everyone cooks the total amount of time in a smoker/grill with offset box and things turn out just fine? Prizes are won, competitions are won, accolades all around, and not one oven was used!

Just use briquettes to cook with, or lump hardwood, use no more wood smoking chunks. I've cooked a pork shoulder for 18 hours, I've cooked a 24-lb. turkey for 22 hours, both in a smoker, without any problem of them being over-smoked.
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Old 06-13-2007, 11:20 AM   #25
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In support of what Miss Elf says. It is not the BBQ appliance, nor the long duration of the cooking time that causes over smoked meats, but rather the use of to much flavoring wood causing excessive smoke.

An anology might be, It is not the bow and arrow, but rather the Indain shooting it that makes the difference.




(Miss Elf if this ain't what ya meant, please don't send me to the wood shed!)
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Old 06-13-2007, 11:28 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
In support of what Miss Elf says. It is not the BBQ appliance, nor the long duration of the cooking time that causes over smoked meats, but rather the use of to much flavoring wood causing excessive smoke.

An anology might be, It is not the bow and arrow, but rather the Indain shooting it that makes the difference.




(Miss Elf if this ain't what ya meant, please don't send me to the wood shed!)
LOL - no woodshed for you UB - that is exactly what I meant.
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Old 06-13-2007, 11:32 AM   #27
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I leaned that the first time I smoked a rack of ribs. Waaaay too much Mesquite.
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Old 06-13-2007, 12:24 PM   #28
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BTW, not to confuze matters . It's a 7.27 lb. picnic.
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Old 06-13-2007, 12:25 PM   #29
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I did the same with a huge hunk of pork butt - It just took a bit of cider-based sauce and thoroughly mixing the outside into the inside while I chopped - whew - it was bitter!
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Old 06-13-2007, 12:44 PM   #30
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VArious woods can be used with pork. Mesquite isn't quite as bitter as hickory can be. But hickory only becomes bitter if too much smoke is generated and absorbed into the meat. Fruit-woods such as apple an cherry produce a less bitter smoke and aren't quite as pungeant as is hickory. I personally prefer fruitwoods for pork and hickory for fish. For poultry, I like maple, white birch, white oak, alder, and mesquite. Each of these woods gives a great flavor without adding any bitterness.

The advantage of hickory is that it is widely available, and has a sharp, tangy flavor that is excellent when used properly. But for the novice, the fruitwoods are easier to play with. Even Cedar can be used, though it is much better with fish than with pork.

I sucessfully smoke turkeys, large pork roasts, etc., on a Webber Kettle Barbecue. The secret to that device is to control the amount of air getting to thte fire. I also use large disks of the flavoing wood, pre-soaked, and placed directly on a divided bed of coals to help insulate the meat from the direct heat of the charcoal. It burns slow and long. Temperature regulation is achieved strictly by use of the air vents, either starving the fire, or allowing a full rush of air to the fuel.

rubs and mops containing a lot of sugar will burn before the meat is done. So if you are using a rub or mopping sauce, keep the sugar to a minimum. If you are using a sauce loaded with sugar, brown, white, honey, etc., use it as a finishing sauce for the last ten minutes or so of cooking time.

As was said previously, use a meat thermometer and forget about time. When the temperature is right, the meat is done. Cook it too long and you take the chance of overcooking and turning the meat into something dry, and very tough.

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