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Old 07-01-2011, 12:30 PM   #1
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Key to make good BBQ ribs?

I got some pork backribs for Indep day. But I have never Q'ed ribs before. I only have done chicken successfully on the smoker. Back in the days my stepdad would make bbq ribs quite often,but it usually turned out dry and meatless. I would like to ask what's the best way to bbq ribs, does the temp need to be around 220 and how many hours should I smoke it, and whether covered with foil or not?

Thanks!

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Old 07-01-2011, 12:45 PM   #2
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You are going to get lots of advice on this one. There are some experienced rib cookers hanging around here. I have tried many different ways, from sworn authentic methods, to newer blasphemous ones. I have two smokers, a gas grill, bbq, and a fire pit. So, I've given them a go on just about everything.
Our favorite ribs around here are made with a two step process. First, I cook them in the oven, in a roasting pan, tightly sealed with foil, with a bit of tomato juice and water, a few garlic cloves, steak spice, for two hours at 275-300, dependng on the size of the ribs. Then I move them out to the grill on low for about one hour, flipping and saucing every 10 minutes or so making sure to keep the lid closed at all times in between the flipping and saucing. I usually add one smoker box full of chips. I use a homemade, ketchup based sauce and move them over and finish them off indirectly, so they don't burn. The magic starts to happen after about 40 minutes. They form a nice candied glaze and the sauce starts to get gooey and sticky. Heaven. I like to splash a bit of Louisiana style hot sauce on them so you get this sweet and sour thang going on. The bones pull out clean and it is pure eating bliss.....
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:05 PM   #3
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RockLobster uses a great technique. You can also make a dry rub from brown sugar, soy sauce, or lime juice (Ive used both), chili powder, onion and garlic powder, and slather them all over the ribs. Foil, bake, then transfer to the smoker for an hour or so.

Alternately, I've used the dry rub and placed the ribs into my slow cooker on the low setting overnight, and then thrown into my Webber Kettle, set up with a divided set of coals, covered when hot with sticks of maple, close the lid, close all vents by half, and cook for 40 minutes. These ribs came out perfect. I put that recipe and technique into one of our local papers. My cousin found it, and specifically sought me out to thank me for it. It seems she had company up from North Carolina, where they take their bbq ribs very seriously, of course with the famous Carolina style vinegar based sauce. Her guests told me that the ribs she prepared, using the slow cooker/Webber kettle technique were the best ribs that they'd ever had.

Yep, my head swelled. A northern boy from Michigan won over a Carolina rib lover.

Put the brown sugar, salt, chili powder, onion and garlic powders together. Taste them. Add more of what you think it needs until it tastes right. Add a little soy or lime juice for extra flavor and massage into the meat (make sure the silver skin has been removed from the ribs). Either wrap in foil and bake, or throw then into the slow cooker. This cooks teh ribs to the desired state, keeping them juicy and tender. Smoking them in the smoker, or on the Webber gives you that wonderful smoke flavor. Apple or other fruit woods also make great flavored smoke.

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Old 07-01-2011, 01:27 PM   #4
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I have some dry rub that I use on every bbq I make lol. so in a nutshell, I should first rub the rib (should I leave it overnight?), then cook it slowly covered in a controlled environment (oven), and then finally smoke on the grill and glaze
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:35 PM   #5
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Quote:
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I have some dry rub that I use on every bbq I make lol. so in a nutshell, I should first rub the rib (should I leave it overnight?), then cook it slowly covered in a controlled environment (oven), and then finally smoke on the grill and glaze
If you want to make a Kick ass bbq Comp style, rib that will get the people buying racks of ribs for you next time they come over?

I will give you a basic step by step and I would recommend Cinnamon Docs rub, And buying Apple Juice.
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
I have some dry rub that I use on every bbq I make lol. so in a nutshell, I should first rub the rib (should I leave it overnight?), then cook it slowly covered in a controlled environment (oven), and then finally smoke on the grill and glaze

I would rub it the day before and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate. You can use both the oven and the grill or just the grill if you can maintain the grill at a low temperature for several hours while slow cooking and smoking. If not, start it in the oven and move it to the grill. For the oven time, they should be wrapped in foil or in a foil covered pan.
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:40 PM   #7
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Thanks everyone for the advice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by The OutDoor Chef View Post
If you want to make a Kick ass bbq Comp style, rib that will get the people buying racks of ribs for you next time they come over?

I will give you a basic step by step and I would recommend Cinnamon Docs rub, And buying Apple Juice.

if you don't mind I'll take the recipe:) why apple juice?
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:44 PM   #8
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Well, you can't go wrong with the bake then grill method. It works and is easy to control, especially if you are used to cooking things in the oven. You can even do them ahead and toss them on the grill the next day. No one will know.
Of course, you can't go wrong throwing them in the pit either, there is just more that can go wrong if you aren't on top of things. I think that is half the fun though.
And then there's grilling them indirect, which will produce results within 90% of BBQed ribs, just not quite as smokey, but again, easier to control.

If you have smoked chicken successfully before, go ahead and give the ribs a shot. 220F or thereabouts is good. Foiling them with some liquid a couple hours after smoking will give you some leeway as to cooking them through, but also keeping them moist. Foiling is a great crutch and will also speed up their cooking. It's not necessary, but it too works and is just one more method to help out with things.

If I get my rub on a couple hours in advance of me wanting ribs I'm doing good. Overnight is nice, but not necessary. Give them a good rub, wrap in plastic wrap and when the rub turns to a glaze, they are good to go.

So many ways, so few racks...
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:44 PM   #9
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I would rub it the day before and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate. You can use both the oven and the grill or just the grill if you can maintain the grill at a low temperature for several hours while slow cooking and smoking. If not, start it in the oven and move it to the grill. For the oven time, they should be wrapped in foil or in a foil covered pan.

I put my rub on the first thing in the morning about 2 hours before I start cooking them to guarantee no hammy tasting ribs.

Night before trim them remove the membrane.

Wrap in plastic wrap, and foil.


Next morning 3 hours before you actually throw the ribs on the cooker, take them out of the fridge. Get to room temp, Rub the ribs 2 hours before.

And as soon as you put the ribs on the smoker Sprinkle rub on the ribs again.

3 hours to smoke on the grill grate 275.f

2 hours in Foil with a 1/4 cup of apple juice, more rub.

1 hour on the grill grate again at 275. Mop with bbq sauce, let the sauce set.

Take them off the grill, Let the rest 15 minutes ( minimum resting time ).

Sprits with apple juice.

Then slice the bad boys so you get 2 bones per rib.

Done.
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Old 07-01-2011, 01:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Well, you can't go wrong with the bake then grill method. It works and is easy to control, especially if you are used to cooking things in the oven. You can even do them ahead and toss them on the grill the next day. No one will know.
Of course, you can't go wrong throwing them in the pit either, there is just more that can go wrong if you aren't on top of things. I think that is half the fun though.
And then there's grilling them indirect, which will produce results within 90% of BBQed ribs, just not quite as smokey, but again, easier to control.

If you have smoked chicken successfully before, go ahead and give the ribs a shot. 220F or thereabouts is good. Foiling them with some liquid a couple hours after smoking will give you some leeway as to cooking them through, but also keeping them moist. Foiling is a great crutch and will also speed up their cooking. It's not necessary, but it too works and is just one more method to help out with things.

If I get my rub on a couple hours in advance of me wanting ribs I'm doing good. Overnight is nice, but not necessary. Give them a good rub, wrap in plastic wrap and when the rub turns to a glaze, they are good to go.

So many ways, so few racks...
my issue is I only have a charcoal weber kettle :) it's very hard to control the temperature. with smoked chicken though, the brined chicken can tolerate high heat pretty well (it can go above 300 inside the kettle sometimes), but I'm not so sure about the ribs. will bake-and-smoke method be able to put enough smokiness on the meat?
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