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Old 01-22-2007, 10:04 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
Did you pick up the side smoker box?
I did.. I use it primarily for smoking in fact.. I like to smoke Turkey's, Pork Roasts for Pulled Pork, and Tri-Tips.. I also have a vertical square style smoker, but I much prefer the Char-Griller with a dry smoke.

-Brad
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Old 01-22-2007, 10:06 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
Candelbc...

The conditions you describe...10* outside temp. vs. very hot inside your grill is a "perfect storm" for creosote build up. This is NOT the only factor that can cause it however....I doubt that what you saw underneath your lid happened today as you prepared to cook your chicken...Could have been a couple of things...paint peeling....or creosote build up over many many times of using your grill...my guess maybe a combination of the two...Take a wire brush and give the inside of the lid a darn good cleaning to remove all of the flakey stuff so it want fall in small peices on your food! Again Creosote...the causes of and preventions of as well as the dangers of... are to lengthy to go into in this forum..I would advise you ...do some research on the subject.

Again...Smoke is like salt...a little goes along way! (I usually get big bucks for that tip )

Oh well....

Enjoy...
I do believe that it was the Creosote, not paint... I think this because of the colder temperatures, and because I use the grill more with the offset firebox for smoking. It's was like homemade black cheeto's... It was kinda cool in fact..

I ended up not grilling the chicken and just baked off all of the creosote.. Then I scraped the rest off and will vacumn it out once its cooled...

-Brad
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Old 01-22-2007, 10:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by candelbc
I did.. I use it primarily for smoking in fact.. I like to smoke Turkey's, Pork Roasts for Pulled Pork, and Tri-Tips.. I also have a vertical square style smoker, but I much prefer the Char-Griller with a dry smoke.

-Brad
So, I could have my wood fire in the side box and have indirect cooking on the grill, correct?
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Old 01-22-2007, 10:54 AM   #14
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That is correct.. I actually use the side fire box for my Charcoal and Wood Chips.. I find I get a really good quality smoke by taking the pre-heated charcoal, and then putting wood chunks in an aluminum foil basket (To keep it from starting on fire)...

I love my Char Griller... It's a great grill that you can also use as a smoker.

-Brad
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Old 01-22-2007, 11:07 AM   #15
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I'm going to pick up the side box for mine as well. I lost 1/4 - 1/3 of the real estate with the fire inside the grill.
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Old 01-22-2007, 11:31 AM   #16
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It's definitely worth the investment.. I am just now getting used to creating a good flow of smoke..

Remember to keep the Chimney Flip Lid open when smoking.. That'll keep the smoke flowing... You probably already knew this, but it was worth mentioning..

-Brad
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Old 01-22-2007, 11:55 AM   #17
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I used one whole bag of Char Broil mesquite chunks from Lowes. It recommended soaking the wood in water for an hour, so I soaked a few pieces to see if there was any difference (as I was experimenting the whole time). There really was no difference soaked or not soaked. I had the side damper opened about 1/4 and the chimney lid open about the same. When tending, I only added 4-5 3" pieces at a time, it developed some serious smoke. It only flamed up when I opened the lid to baste. I had a steady temp of 200-225 for 5 hrs (it was also about 30 deg. outside). How is the heat flow with the side mounted firebox? With the wood in a separate chamber, will I need a larger fire?
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Old 01-22-2007, 12:29 PM   #18
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I don't really personally soak my chunks in water any more. It was a step that I found I didn't need. Especially by using the Aluminum foil to prevent a fire. What's even nicer is that I can just remove one bunch of ash and replace with another bunch of Chunks..

Once I get my heat to around 150 I put the chunks over the fire and let it start smoking. Once I get the smoke, I close of the damper a little more and open the Chimney lid all the way as recommended. I get a nice white smoke for a long period of time.

Just my way of doing it.. I am always learning myself though..

-Brad
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Old 01-22-2007, 12:50 PM   #19
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I sent the LOML shopping, so now I have a rack ready for Saturday. I'll try the foil and top lid method you stated. Thanks for the tip. -J
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Old 01-22-2007, 12:54 PM   #20
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Welcome to the smoking club. Rather than buy the wood chunks, if you can get some fresh cut green wood. I grow a couple of apple trees in the back yard just for that purpose. Then soak the wood in a bucket of water overnight. The wood you buy is usually so dry it acts like firewood rather than smoke wood. The creosote is common and sometimes you just have to get a hot fire going and burn it out. In reality, creosote is jsut condensed smoke. Too much is a bad thing though. And by the way, the stuff, when it catches fire will burn really hot.
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