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Old 08-17-2008, 12:31 PM   #1
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Need help, smoking a suckling pig.

We bought a small....real small, pig a while ago. The DW had to cut it in half crosswise because it couldn't fit in the oven. She roasted the hind part and we froze the front. LOL When I tasted the meat from the oven it was pretty greasy. It's been on the smoker for 2-3 hours now and the skin/fat isn't really rendering down. Should I cut slits in it like a ham or what?

I also threw on some babybacks for insurance.

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Old 08-17-2008, 01:04 PM   #2
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never done one .. always wanted to ...
but i would think that it needs to cook a while longer
before the fat starts to render .. but i am assuming since you
said smoking you are in the 225 - 250* range ..
good luck ..
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Old 08-17-2008, 01:05 PM   #3
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Yeah, I'm at 225-250. I just want to try to get some of the fat/grease out.
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Old 08-17-2008, 01:26 PM   #4
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I too say it might take awhile before the fat starts rendering. WHERE ARE THE PICS?????????????????? Geez - I thought you knew better!!!!!!!!!!!1
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Old 08-17-2008, 03:12 PM   #5
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It's hard to render as much fat without overcooking what little meat was on this thing. I was able to render alot of it, but it was still greasy in the rib area. I ate a whole pork butt myself! ...and it wasn't too bad.

All in all, don't waste your time or money on a suckling. Get a cut from a larger pig.



And the insurance ribs.



This is how I check if my ribs are done. When the ribs begin to seperate holding them this way, they're done.



My new thermometer with a hypodermic style probe.

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Old 08-17-2008, 04:17 PM   #6
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i check my ribs the same way ..
i love that sauce ..
i must have one of those probes ...
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Old 08-17-2008, 04:25 PM   #7
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I see some coals under the pig - - - - I wonder if a more indirect method would have been better and I wonder if it was split if that would have helped and turning it belly up, let the grease be on the bottom, and even lightly tenting. I'm not familiar with smoking a suckling pig though. A friend of mine is the head chef at a fancy schmancy restaurant in Savannah and I asked him how he cooked his suckling pig and he started out with...first you have to catch the pig out back.... I told him to skip to the part where it was ready to cook
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Old 08-17-2008, 04:43 PM   #8
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Elf, those coals were leftovers from the lobstas I did. This was all indirect using the side fire box. I used all wood. Mainly apple with some oak to rebuild the temps every so often. After we cut the meat, the tray was soaked with grease.

I think those sucklings are just greasy and not worth the while, IMHO.

Q, if you're really interested I can give you the info. The whole unit was under $100. I bought it for Sous Vide, but it works great with meats too.
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Old 08-17-2008, 04:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I bought it for Sous Vide, but it works great with meats too.
If you bought it for Sous Vide then why doesn't she still have it (sowwy).

You may be right - just too greasy.
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