"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > BBQ & Smokin' Meats
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-29-2008, 09:23 AM   #41
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by QSis View Post
No, LT.

Many, many of us use the "Minion Method" in our bullet-type (and other) smokers. Jim Minion used to post here, but hasn't in a long time.

I use only Kingsford for fuel in my Weber Smokey Mountain, because it is readily available and burns slowly and steadily. I do use wood chips or chunks for flavoring. Hickory is my favorite. I've done very well with this combo in BBQ competitions.

(Wish Jim would jump in on this one!)

I only use lump charcoal for hot and fast grilling in my kettle.

Lee
Now thats interesting. I always thought that the smoke from starting the fresh charcoal contained toxins and made your meat taste funny.
__________________

__________________
*A substitute for human interaction* - I really need to find a girl whos name doesnt end with .JPG
http://grillofmydreams.bluedisk.org
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 09:31 AM   #42
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by LT72884 View Post
Now thats interesting. I always thought that the smoke from starting the fresh charcoal contained toxins and made your meat taste funny.
I am guessing that what you are thinking of is if lighter fluid is used.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 09:42 AM   #43
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
I am guessing that what you are thinking of is if lighter fluid is used.
OH good point, maybe thats it. Thats why i have a cheminy i guess.
__________________
*A substitute for human interaction* - I really need to find a girl whos name doesnt end with .JPG
http://grillofmydreams.bluedisk.org
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 09:43 AM   #44
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by LT72884 View Post
did you get my PM i sent you??
...........................
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 10:02 AM   #45
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by LT72884 View Post
Now thats interesting. I always thought that the smoke from starting the fresh charcoal contained toxins and made your meat taste funny.
I'll try to "dumb it down" for ya.

Match-Light Charchoal Briquettes- contains chemicals that will alter the flavor of your food. However, you don't need to use a chimney to start it.

Kingsford Briquettes - Briquettes need to be started in a chimney. When the briquettes burn down, you need to start every new batch in a chimney.

Briquette pros - slow burning steady heat.
Briquette cons - need to be started in a chimney every time, leaves alot of ash which can get in the way during long cooks.

Lump charcoal - Lump charcoal is partially burned wood chips/chunks. They can be started in a chimney but can also just be added to the exsisting coals.

Lump pros - no need to chimney start each batch, almost no ash.
Lump cons - burns slightly hotter and faster than briquettes, so long cooks will need to be tended to more often.

Natural Wood - True barbecuing. Great flavor, some species like Applewood have pretty long burn times. Initially needs to be started using newspaper/twigs or some starting method. I have even used a small batch of hot lump to start the logs.

Wood pros - flavor, long burn times
Wood cons - you usually need to cut/split to fit in the smoker, temps can be a little erratic so you will need to keep an eye on it more often.

I have used all three and prefer natural wood. I have a wood burning fireplace so I usually grab some cherry or oak from there and cut it to fit in the smoker. Second to wood would be lump because of the ease of use, no ash and higher temps. It seems to burn at exactly 225F in my smoker. Lastly would be briquettes. I find having to start each batch in a chimney is a hassle. The ash can really build up which can affect how new briquettes burn in the smoker. I had to empty mine out once which was not an easy task. Match light is good for hotdogs and hamburgers at a cookout, not recommended for barbequeing.

People prefer different methods and fuels. So you'll need to find which one you like on your own by trying each one out.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 10:05 AM   #46
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Get a chimney, bag of lump and start from there. Don't even worry about the Minion method or anything along those lines until you familiarize yourself with this type of cooking. There are great "how-to's" on this site and many others. It's very easy to wind up with great results. The hard part is trying to out do yourself each time you smoke something.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 12:52 PM   #47
Head Chef
 
LT72884's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: UTAH, BABY
Posts: 1,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz View Post
I'll try to "dumb it down" for ya.

Match-Light Charchoal Briquettes- contains chemicals that will alter the flavor of your food. However, you don't need to use a chimney to start it.

Kingsford Briquettes - Briquettes need to be started in a chimney. When the briquettes burn down, you need to start every new batch in a chimney.

Briquette pros - slow burning steady heat.
Briquette cons - need to be started in a chimney every time, leaves alot of ash which can get in the way during long cooks.

Lump charcoal - Lump charcoal is partially burned wood chips/chunks. They can be started in a chimney but can also just be added to the exsisting coals.

Lump pros - no need to chimney start each batch, almost no ash.
Lump cons - burns slightly hotter and faster than briquettes, so long cooks will need to be tended to more often.

Natural Wood - True barbecuing. Great flavor, some species like Applewood have pretty long burn times. Initially needs to be started using newspaper/twigs or some starting method. I have even used a small batch of hot lump to start the logs.

Wood pros - flavor, long burn times
Wood cons - you usually need to cut/split to fit in the smoker, temps can be a little erratic so you will need to keep an eye on it more often.

I have used all three and prefer natural wood. I have a wood burning fireplace so I usually grab some cherry or oak from there and cut it to fit in the smoker. Second to wood would be lump because of the ease of use, no ash and higher temps. It seems to burn at exactly 225F in my smoker. Lastly would be briquettes. I find having to start each batch in a chimney is a hassle. The ash can really build up which can affect how new briquettes burn in the smoker. I had to empty mine out once which was not an easy task. Match light is good for hotdogs and hamburgers at a cookout, not recommended for barbequeing.

People prefer different methods and fuels. So you'll need to find which one you like on your own by trying each one out.
thanx dude, thats alot of info regarding charcoal. I tired to dutch oven once using logs but it go to hot and to hard to control in the fire pit. i was like 12 years old when i did that.

Is lump coal something i have to buy online or is it something i can buy at home depot or lowes?
__________________
*A substitute for human interaction* - I really need to find a girl whos name doesnt end with .JPG
http://grillofmydreams.bluedisk.org
LT72884 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 01:02 PM   #48
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
I'm all about using a chimney too - I have 4 of them. It's a no-brainer. Takes 20 minutes and you're ready. Keep an ash can close by if you need to dump hot coals. I've never had to even in a 10-hour cooking frame. I bought lump charcoal at my grocery store.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 01:03 PM   #49
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
I buy the lump charchoal at Lowes. My store carries the Cowboy and Royal Oak brands. Look in the BBQ accessories aisle. A large bag is like $7. They also have the chimneys and other stuff there. Start with the lump and go from there. You can pick up a small bag of mesquite while your there. Just toss a couple pieces onto the coals to add some more flavor. Don't smoke with 100% mesquite though (been there, done that) just use it like you would spices.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2008, 01:12 PM   #50
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Oh.

Don't bug out when you see the lump charchoal pieces. LOL

You'll see some oak tongue and groove flooring, trim, picture frame, etc. Don't worry. They are just solid wood scraps from factories.
__________________

__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.