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Old 07-14-2016, 03:57 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
You might want to read this, which I posted earlier: Smoking meat
A well-written piece, but not that far away from what I do. For pulled pork, I start with the Bradley recipe, which calls for 210F smoker-internal temperature and a 6-hour smoke. I drop the temp down to ~190F to get a longer smoke, and the smoker turns off when meat-internal temp is 160F.

I'm not too worried, but I wonder if the recipe would be ruined by first pasteurizing the pork?
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Old 07-14-2016, 04:29 PM   #22
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Shameless shilling for the Bradley Smoker

The Canadian Bradley is a very good smoker. It feeds a fresh hockey-puck of compressed sawdust onto the smoking element every 20 minutes, dousing the old ones in water and keeping the smoke very fresh. Pucks come in all the usual woods, but sometimes they add a limited edition of whisky- or wine-barrel pucks.



They sell a fancy computer-controlled version, but best to skip that and get the original, and add the Auber Bradley controller. It's a royal pain to program, but allows infinite control of temperature and smoke. You can program up to a 99-hour smoke where all you have to do is occasionally clean out the water bath and stack up some more pucks. (It'll also turn a standard slow cooker into a ~1F sous vide machine.)

Bradley also sells just their smoke generator, which allows you to turn an old fridge or whatever into an excellent smoker for less than $200.



They also sell an excellent cold-smoking adapter, which keeps smoker-internal temperature to ~15F above ambient. Highly recommended.
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Old 07-14-2016, 10:17 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Baby back ribs are available where I live, as well as other types of ribs. I've even seen cross-cut Korean-style ribs.

Guide to ribs. They're called baby back ribs because they're smaller and shorter than the other ribs.
http://www.chowstatic.com/blog-media...lustration.jpg
The 3 big chain supermarkets here...Albertson's, Vons, and Ralph's all sell only Farmer John uncooked pork loin ribs. And they're never anywhere near baby back sized. It's as if they have a monopoly in these parts, or something. The butcher counter pretty much just opens a pack of those to put behind the counter glass, the rest are in a refrigerated square tub out on the aisle.
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Old 08-07-2016, 09:45 AM   #24
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I've never seen any posts about smoking where they use any less than about 220 F. Even on the smoking forum (smokingmeatforums.com) I've never seen anyone use lower than that. I'd call it a bit of a risk.
This is what I am talking about. The mini chief smoker I have doesn't get that hot. Furthermore, this would leave me to wonder how they can safely sell a food preparation appliance that will not heat meat to an acceptable temperature.
Although, internal temp of pork is recommended at 160 and this unit gets up to 165, so technically, if left in there long enough, the meat should become adequately cooked. Surely the department of health must have approved of this smoker because of this factor...I don't get it...

I'm going to use it again today and am going to smoke some pork chops and shrink wrap them for future use...let's hope it works....
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Old 08-07-2016, 10:14 AM   #25
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Although, internal temp of pork is recommended at 160 and this unit gets up to 165, so technically, if left in there long enough, the meat should become adequately cooked. Surely the department of health must have approved of this smoker because of this factor...I don't get it...
The USDA in 2011 updated their guidelines for doneness of pork to 145F. Trichinellosis is extremely rare in the United States these days.

https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html
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Old 08-07-2016, 11:50 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
The USDA in 2011 updated their guidelines for doneness of pork to 145F. Trichinellosis is extremely rare in the United States these days.

https://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html
Yeah. Even better...large scale commercial farming took care of that....one good thing about it, I guess....
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Old 08-07-2016, 12:37 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
This is what I am talking about. The mini chief smoker I have doesn't get that hot. Furthermore, this would leave me to wonder how they can safely sell a food preparation appliance that will not heat meat to an acceptable temperature.
Although, internal temp of pork is recommended at 160 and this unit gets up to 165, so technically, if left in there long enough, the meat should become adequately cooked. Surely the department of health must have approved of this smoker because of this factor...I don't get it...

I'm going to use it again today and am going to smoke some pork chops and shrink wrap them for future use...let's hope it works....
I think that for me part of the issue with such a low maximum temperature is that one facet of smoking many meats is the crust or bark that you get. When the unit only reaches 165, I doubt that you would get much, if any, bark.
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Old 08-07-2016, 01:32 PM   #28
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I think that for me part of the issue with such a low maximum temperature is that one facet of smoking many meats is the crust or bark that you get. When the unit only reaches 165, I doubt that you would get much, if any, bark.
I've been using it for the 3-2-1 method. It worked fine the first time. I have ribs on it now. I'll post a pic when the 3 hours is up....
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Old 08-07-2016, 01:58 PM   #29
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IMO, the issue with smoking at such low temps means the meats are in the temperature danger zone for too long. I wouldn't consider smoking at temps below 200F.
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Old 08-07-2016, 02:18 PM   #30
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IMO, the issue with smoking at such low temps means the meats are in the temperature danger zone for too long. I wouldn't consider smoking at temps below 200F.
I'm wondering this myself but how could they sell a product that would not be safe to use?https://www.smokehouseproducts.com/p...ant=4957365891
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