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Old 06-19-2007, 08:46 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
On the brisket, isn't there a section that should be cooked seperately? I have to see if I can find the article on those. When I re coop from the shoulder, I may try one.

Great pics.
Yep in some cases the point is separated from the flat and cooked separately. But like a lot of things, I do it differently. I cook the whole packer brisket together and make sure the whole thing gets up to heat before I pull it.Temp determines when it is done.
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Old 06-19-2007, 10:04 AM   #12
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What smoker are you using? and what temp was the brisket cooked at and the finished temp.

Thanks.
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Old 06-19-2007, 12:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeekinz
What smoker are you using? and what temp was the brisket cooked at and the finished temp.

Thanks.
I have a Charbroil brand offset smoker. I smoked at between 225 and 245 degrees and pulled it at an internal temp of 190. It plateaued at 160 for over 2 hours which was worrisome but then went up rather quickly.
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Old 06-19-2007, 02:49 PM   #14
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Paymaster, the "plateau" you mentioned is normal. That indicates that the connective tissues are breaking down into gelatin. The temperature won't start to rise again until the bulk of the collagen has broken down. Once it starts rising again, and hits 190 degrees F, then you know that the connective tissues have rendered and the meat is tender.
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Old 06-19-2007, 03:03 PM   #15
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Paymaster, the "plateau" you mentioned is normal. That indicates that the connective tissues are breaking down into gelatin. The temperature won't start to rise again until the bulk of the collagen has broken down. Once it starts rising again, and hits 190 degrees F, then you know that the connective tissues have rendered and the meat is tender.
Yeah thanks. I have known that, but this time it just seemed longer.
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Old 06-19-2007, 03:35 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK
Paymaster, the "plateau" you mentioned is normal. That indicates that the connective tissues are breaking down into gelatin. The temperature won't start to rise again until the bulk of the collagen has broken down. Once it starts rising again, and hits 190 degrees F, then you know that the connective tissues have rendered and the meat is tender.
So when I was smoking the shoulder last Saturday, and it wouldn't go above 183 deg., thats what was happening?
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