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Old 07-14-2006, 03:06 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
Low and slow is the key. You can have the fall off the bone goodnes, and it still be held together by the "bark".
I typically don't parboil them, but I have brined them, and let them go in a low oven,250-275MAX, for about 2 hours, then uncovered and sauced for about 45min...from there you can either eat em' up, or move to a grill and really get the "bark" built up. I have seen them done a million and six different ways though, I guess it is a matter of personal taste.
If you don't feel compelled to fire up the grill you can do it in the oven or even in a crock pot. Low and slow is more important than heat source. It just takes time at fairly low temperature to break down the connective tissue that gives you that fallin' of the bone unctuous finger lickin' quality. Tell anybody in Memphis I said this and I'll deny it!
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Old 07-14-2006, 03:09 PM   #12
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Oh Andy M. - please don't think I was dissing your advice. I really wasn't! I just really was surprised that BRIEFLY parboiling seemed to be a minority choice since my ribs always turn out so nice.

But like with anything having to do with food (or gardening, livestock raising, ad infinitum), it's what works best for you that counts!! : )
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Old 07-14-2006, 03:19 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
If you don't feel compelled to fire up the grill you can do it in the oven or even in a crock pot. Low and slow is more important than heat source. It just takes time at fairly low temperature to break down the connective tissue that gives you that fallin' of the bone unctuous finger lickin' quality. Tell anybody in Memphis I said this and I'll deny it!

I have done them in the ol crock pot numerous times and have always been pleased with the results. Normally I do the big boy, country style ribs in the crock, and slab style in the oven or grill/smoker.

I though you memphasites did dry rub and grilled? are you holding a seceret?
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Old 07-14-2006, 03:41 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
I though you memphasites did dry rub and grilled? are you holding a seceret?
Well TATTRAT, I don't speak for the city but in my experience Memphians are pretty well split between dry and wet but I think of grilled as direct heat over pretty hot fire and I don't think that works anywhere. I'm pretty sure that's not what you meant by grilled and I'm also pretty sure that Breezy didn't mean this, but I've had ribs that were "parboiled" then slathered in sweet tomato based sauce and slapped on a hot grill 'till the tomato and sugar charred and somebody rang the dinner bell.
Like you said, Low and slow is the key.
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Old 07-14-2006, 04:01 PM   #15
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As far as grilled, I do the indirect method: one side ripping coals, the other side nothing. It creates good convection when the ports are open. As far as finishing, I do go over the hot spot just long enough to caramlize things, but it can burn real quick if you are not paying attention.

Think I might have to do a Memphis trip so I can judge for myself on the whole wet/dry eternal battle. ;-)
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Old 07-14-2006, 04:11 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.

Also, I heard a judge on one of those many BBQ shows say that if the meat is actually falling off the bone, it's been cooked too long.
I took a BBQ class from a local chef who has won many many BBQ competitions. yes he is from the North, but he was taught how to BBQ from a Master down South (sorry I do not recall his name, but I am sure someone here could probably guess it).

Anyway he told us the same thing. Rib meat should not be falling off the bones.

Personally I like when it does fall off the bone. I do not find it to be overcooked or anything like that.

Breezy to answer your question about par boiling washing away flavor, but yours tasting great I will ask you a question. Have you ever made your ribs without par boiling first? If the answer is no then I will put this forward. Maybe your ribs would taste as good as they always do and then some if you did not par boil and wash some of that flavor away.

I do not know if that is true. I am just offering a possibility.
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Old 07-14-2006, 04:19 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skilletlicker
Well TATTRAT, I don't speak for the city but in my experience Memphians are pretty well split between dry and wet but I think of grilled as direct heat over pretty hot fire and I don't think that works anywhere. I'm pretty sure that's not what you meant by grilled and I'm also pretty sure that Breezy didn't mean this, but I've had ribs that were "parboiled" then slathered in sweet tomato based sauce and slapped on a hot grill 'till the tomato and sugar charred and somebody rang the dinner bell.
Like you said, Low and slow is the key.
I hope you didn't eat those "parboiled" ribs in Memphis, skilletlicker! No self-respecting Memphian should EVER do that to a good rack of ribs.

I married a Memphis boy and he is an eternal fan of the Rendezvous-style dry ribs. I'm more of a wet whistle myself.

Having said that, we have both succumbed to simmering them briefly in water and then shucking them into the oven, usually in a bath of Wicker's basting sauce. They turn out pretty well, especially if you put your rub on first and then let them take a nap in the fridge for a while.
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Old 07-14-2006, 04:35 PM   #18
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Yup - have tried them both ways, & a couple of times due to just trying different recipes. I have to say that I still like them parboiled first. Personal opinion & taste this may be, but I've yet to have any complaints - even from fellow cooking afficionados who know I want the real scoop.

Re: Skilletlicker, no, we didn't pop them from the boiling water, slather them with tomato-based sauce & grill them - lol!!! (And no, Skillet - I'm not offended - lol!!!). Like I said before, the ribs were, in effect, BLANCHED, in boiling water for about 10 minutes (depending upon size/weight). You'd be amazed at how much fat/grease blanched out. They weren't even remotely cooked through. After that, they were coated with whatever sauce we were using (vinegar based, barbeque type, cajun, whatever). They were then placed on the grill over indirect heat (aka off the coals - like I'm sure you all know what I'm talking about - lol). No further sauce basting was done for another 10 minutes or so, at which time they were basted again & moved over the heat. More bastings for another 10 minutes or until the ribs were done to our satisfaction.
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Old 07-14-2006, 04:40 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
I have done them in the ol crock pot numerous times and have always been pleased with the results. Normally I do the big boy, country style ribs in the crock, and slab style in the oven or grill/smoker.
I think of "big boy, country style" as beef ribs and I agree they are better suited to the crock pot. On fear of being of run out of town, my attention span is insufficient for doing spareribs on the grill. The need to keep the temperature low enough to cook continuously that many hours without burning interferes with my ability to focus on the ball games. My hat's off to those who are willing to pay attention (stay sober) that long if they aren't being paid to do it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TATTRAT
Think I might have to do a Memphis trip so I can judge for myself on the whole wet/dry eternal battle. ;-)
For Dry; try Rendevoux downtown and for wet try Corky's in East Memphis.
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Old 07-14-2006, 04:48 PM   #20
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Skillet, you hit on my fave Memphis joint - Corky's. For the rest of you, Corky's will FedEx grub anywhere.
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