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Old 10-12-2005, 06:20 PM   #21
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Hey Raine, nice to see a familure face.
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Old 10-18-2005, 12:21 PM   #22
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Yeah another BBQ'r, and competition team! Glad to see ya Bill. Qsis is a member here as well.
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Old 02-10-2006, 05:00 PM   #23
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Here's some chuck roasts I did this past weekend. I got two 8.5lb chuck roasts right from my butcher, rubbed them down with Wolfe Rub and put them on the smoker using oak and hickory. Cooked with a pit temp of 235* until internal temps hit 160*, then wrapped them both in heavy duty aluminum foil and continued to cook at 235* until the internal temps hit 210*. Let them rest in the foil, then pulled/shredded and sprinkled with additional rub. To give you an idea of how much these shrink, I started off with approx. 17lbs of raw meat and ended up with 9lbs finished product. So plan accordingly!


http://www.ephotohut.net/viewpic.cfm...0206104129.JPG
http://www.ephotohut.net/viewpic.cfm...0206153821.JPG
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Old 02-11-2006, 09:13 AM   #24
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Larry, that's some nice-lookin' meat ya got there!

Question: Do you save the juices that come out of your chuck roasts and use them for anything?

The reason I ask, is that the last time I smoked anything last year, I smoked a couple of pork butts. I saved all the leftover pulled pork, as well as the juices that came from them. I've found that these juices are most the natural gelatin rendered from the meat, and some of the fat as well. I skimmed the fat, and used the gelatin as well as the leftover pulled pork, and made a most excellent Posole with it.
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Old 02-11-2006, 09:47 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenMI
Larry, that's some nice-lookin' meat ya got there!

Question: Do you save the juices that come out of your chuck roasts and use them for anything?

The reason I ask, is that the last time I smoked anything last year, I smoked a couple of pork butts. I saved all the leftover pulled pork, as well as the juices that came from them. I've found that these juices are most the natural gelatin rendered from the meat, and some of the fat as well. I skimmed the fat, and used the gelatin as well as the leftover pulled pork, and made a most excellent Posole with it.
With chuck I mix most of the juices back into the meat, otherwise the chuck will be on the dry side. But I don't foil pulled pork until it comes off the cooker. I will foil it once it's done if I'm planning on resting, otherwise whatever juices are left when it's done cooking are left in the pan with the pulled pork.
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Old 02-11-2006, 10:17 AM   #26
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Do not brine beef. That is called corning. There is more than one way to fix a smoked roast. I have smoked sirloin tips that are delicious. They remain rare but have the nice smoke ring. Sliced thin across the grain they are tender and flavorful. I don't think chuck is a candidate for smoking. I think you could make a delicious pulled beef recipe in a crockpot however. Have done it--slice 4 or 5 onions and put in bottom of crockpot. Put in 5# chuck roast. Pour a can of beer and 15 oz. of BBQ sauce over it. Cook for 8-10 hours until falling apart. Concentrat the sauce/juices and serve on sub rolls.
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Old 02-11-2006, 11:53 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
Do not brine beef. That is called corning. There is more than one way to fix a smoked roast. I have smoked sirloin tips that are delicious. They remain rare but have the nice smoke ring. Sliced thin across the grain they are tender and flavorful. I don't think chuck is a candidate for smoking. I think you could make a delicious pulled beef recipe in a crockpot however. Have done it--slice 4 or 5 onions and put in bottom of crockpot. Put in 5# chuck roast. Pour a can of beer and 15 oz. of BBQ sauce over it. Cook for 8-10 hours until falling apart. Concentrat the sauce/juices and serve on sub rolls.
I beg to differ on this one Gretchen. I've been smoking chuck for years without any problems. What's your rationale for chuck not being a good candidate for smoking? The thought of cookin BBQ or any kind in a crock pot makes my skin crawl. Now I'm not saying years and years ago I haven't done it, cause I have. But I'd never even consider it now. There is a HUGE difference between pit cooked BBQ and the mushy mess you get from a crock pot. There would be nothing wrong with brining beef or anyother cut of meat for that matter. All brining does is promote tenderness and increases the moisture content of a normally dry piece of meat. Is it necessary on a chuck roast? No, but it wouldn't hurt it either.
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Old 02-11-2006, 01:07 PM   #28
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I would agree wholeheartedly that pit cooking is better. Maybe I will give chuck a try in my smoker.
As far as brining is concerned, beef in a brine becomes corned.


Beef, lamb, duck, and other meats with high fat content and bold flavors do not benefit from brining--they're naturally moist and flavorful. They also tend to be cooked to lower internal temperatures and thus don't lose as much of their natural moisture. Pork butt is not a good candidate for brining because of its high fat content. Brisket can be brined to become corned beef or pastrami depending on the seasonings used in the brine.
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Old 02-11-2006, 07:06 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
I would agree wholeheartedly that pit cooking is better. Maybe I will give chuck a try in my smoker.
As far as brining is concerned, beef in a brine becomes corned.


Beef, lamb, duck, and other meats with high fat content and bold flavors do not benefit from brining--they're naturally moist and flavorful. They also tend to be cooked to lower internal temperatures and thus don't lose as much of their natural moisture. Pork butt is not a good candidate for brining because of its high fat content. Brisket can be brined to become corned beef or pastrami depending on the seasonings used in the brine.
I agree. But I never said to brine in the first place.......
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Old 07-05-2006, 05:44 PM   #30
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Smoked Chuck ... Try a "Flat-Iron" ... it is from the chuck

The flat iron steak is the top blade steak (infraspinatus muscle) and is cut from the beef shoulder (chuck). It is very tender. Generally sold in 1 to 1 1/3 lb strips that are about 3/4 to 1 inch thick ... smoke like a lean minature brisket but always tender.
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