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Old 07-10-2006, 01:03 PM   #31
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Well, I made my first attempt at smoking beef chuck roast yesterday. I’ll start with the equipment used. No smoker yet, so Vermont Castings VC100 gas grille currently on propane. Using hickory chips, I made up smoke packs with tinfoil. Soaked 1/3rd of the bag and made the packs up 2 handfuls dry to one wet. Removed left side grates and placed a drip pan under the right side. Set one pack of chips on the "v" grate, left side, and set on high to get the smoke started. In about 1/2hr it started to smoke so I turned the grille down (tested this earlier as to what the setting needed to be for about 230deg). I then placed the roasts on which were both approximately 6 to 7Lbs. About 1.5hrs before I put them on I gave them a quick rub with olive oil then a dry rub (just mixed a few things together like Hy's seasoning, Keg Cajun, white pepper, onion powder). Using a temp probe I set for 160. After about 3.5hrs and 3 smoke packs (also kept about ½” of water in the drip pan) it was there. I then wrapped them both in foil and set the probe for 205. After another hour they were there. I took them off and let them rest for about 20min or so in the tin foil then removed and walla!!!...Yummy!!!!. I didn't get much of a smoke ring (I’ll double up on the chips next time), but the taste was there. The one wasn't quite "soft" enough to pull, but the second wasn't too bad. Next time I'll run them up to 210 or I’ll slow the cooking down near the end so it cooks longer at 200 or so (any advice here?).

I had these two roasts in my freezer which is why I did them. Next time will be an attempt at pork and I'll try and remember pictures!!!!

I’m not sure I explained things that well so if anyone has any questions or advice, please let me know.

Keith
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Old 07-10-2006, 01:15 PM   #32
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Why couldn't you put beef in a brine for 24 hours and

just have brined beef and not corned beef? It is my understanding that to make corned beef it takes 2 weeks.
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Old 07-10-2006, 01:15 PM   #33
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Sounds like a great first time!!!! I like to use Hickory chunks versus chips. The chips just don't produce a lot of flavor IMHO. I like to soak all of my chunks though - no dry ones. I soak in 1/2 apple juice and 1/2 water for about 1/2 to 1 hour. I also put apple juice in my drip pan - it totally makes a difference in flavor. I smoke at around 200F - 220F - usually takes a 7 or so pound pork butt about 8 - 10 hours. I use hardwood charcoal instead of briquettes and add just a few Hickory chunks along the way - I have used too much Hickory before and it gives the meat a bitter taste.

I agree with your deduction that you need to cook at a lower temp for longer to get it more pullable.

Did you use any kind of bbq sauce when you ate it?
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Old 07-10-2006, 02:07 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Sounds like a great first time!!!! I like to use Hickory chunks versus chips. The chips just don't produce a lot of flavor IMHO. I like to soak all of my chunks though - no dry ones. I soak in 1/2 apple juice and 1/2 water for about 1/2 to 1 hour. I also put apple juice in my drip pan - it totally makes a difference in flavor. I smoke at around 200°F - 220°F - usually takes a 7 or so pound pork butt about 8 - 10 hours. I use hardwood charcoal instead of briquettes and add just a few Hickory chunks along the way - I have used too much Hickory before and it gives the meat a bitter taste.

I agree with your deduction that you need to cook at a lower temp for longer to get it more pullable.

Did you use any kind of bbq sauce when you ate it?
Thanks for the advice!!!

Actually, I've smoked pork ribs a few times and have always used apple juice for both the wood and the drip pan. Not sure why I didn't with the beef. I guess I just didn't associate the sweet apple juice with beef, but I'm sure it would be great!!!! Next time I will also use the drippings in the drip pan for extra flavor.

I used a bit of hickory flavored BBQ sauce on my toasted bun, but really didn't need any as the flavor was great on its own.

Keith
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Old 07-10-2006, 02:56 PM   #35
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oops - BEEF - you're right there - I always use apple juice with pork. If you want a nice thinnish-type bbq sauce recipe let me know. I have a great one that lasts about 8 months in the fridge and is great to take to bbq's as a host/hostess gift. It's just a nice condiment with smoked pork, beef, or chicken.

A friend of mine smoked a big ol' hunk of beef (can't remember the cut right now) for about 18 hours - you had to crack the crust (which was really yummy) and the meat inside just fell everywhere. There was a good 1 1/2" smoke ring which makes one proud, you know?
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Old 07-10-2006, 03:27 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
oops - BEEF - you're right there - I always use apple juice with pork. If you want a nice thinnish-type bbq sauce recipe let me know. I have a great one that lasts about 8 months in the fridge and is great to take to bbq's as a host/hostess gift. It's just a nice condiment with smoked pork, beef, or chicken.

A friend of mine smoked a big ol' hunk of beef (can't remember the cut right now) for about 18 hours - you had to crack the crust (which was really yummy) and the meat inside just fell everywhere. There was a good 1 1/2" smoke ring which makes one proud, you know?
Well, actually I don't....YET!....hehe. But I will!

I think the crust on mine would have been crunchy if I didn't foil them for the end cooking, which I will try without next time. Being that I had two roasts this time I should have foiled one and not the other to test the difference.....Stupid me!

Anyway, I've been allot less successful in some of my other "first times" so I'm happy!

Hey, I would love the bbq sauce recipe if you care to share. Thanks!

Keith
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Old 02-05-2007, 06:05 PM   #37
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I've smoked several chuck roasts and have been very happy with the results. Here's what I have done:

1. Place in aluminum pan the night before. Cover with olive oil and your favorite seasonings.
2. Let it rest in the refrigerator all night.
3. Leave in aluminum pan and smoke at 225-250 until it reaches 175 internal.
4. Cover with foil and cook at 275 for approx. 2 hours.

Leave it alone for at least an hour. It will be unbelievably tender and juicy. It shreads just like pulled pork. It's worth trying!
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Old 09-07-2009, 08:38 PM   #38
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I picked up a 4 pound sirloin roast from my local grocery store to put on my smoker. I have read many articles where people tried to slow-cook a sirloin and failed. Many stated that it was over cooked and tough, but I was able to achieve success on my first go at it. Typically, sirloin is too lean to slow-cook or smoke and becomes dry and tough, just like sirloin steaks do if they are overcooked.

The night before cooking, I unpacked the big four pound sirloin roast and rubbed it down with some fresh cracked peppercorn and sea salt. I believe that the sea salt helped to cure the outer crust of the roast and allowed it to hold the majority of the flavor and juice. I started my smoker around 10:30am, it is an offset smoker. Using regular old Kingsford charcoal to start with, I think it's a good way to get some heat built up. When the black is gone from the briquettes I added some Jack Daniels charcoal, which contains wood from actual barrells, and then some Jack Daniels smoking blocks around the perimeter of the pit. Some people say to wrap the roast in aluminum foil, but I chose not to do this since it wouldn't have soaked up the good smoke flavor. Once my smoker cooled back down to 200 degrees F, I took the roast (along with some baking potatoes wrapped in foil) and placed them in the smoker. This happened around 11:30am. Throughout the process I added some smaller, aged and dried cherry twigs directly on the hot coals and closed the ventilation on the bottom of the smoke pit. This created an ample amount of flavorful smoke that soaked in really nicely to the roast. You will want to avoid opening the smoker during the cooking process, as you are only dealing with around 200 or 300 degrees of heat, plus you'll just end up losing the smoke flavor.

I was able to keep the temperature between 200 and 250 degrees throughout the entire cooking process by adding small bits of wood to the pit. Airflow is also important and you want to make sure you are trying different things, like adjusting the upper and lower flu's, or vents. Your wood will typically burn hotter and faster with full ventilation and will generate much less smoke. The opposite is true as well, but by closing off the ventilation completely you stand a good chance of putting your fire out or reducing the temperature to an undesirable level.

I kept the lid closed on my sirloin roast and removed it around 3:30pm, so all in all about 4 hours of cook time. I was a little scared to bring it in and slice it, but I could tell after the first cut that it was nothing short of a perfectly smoked slab of meat. About an inch in all around the outside was bright red and the center was extremely juicy and overall had an incredible flavor. No other seasonings or sauces were needed. I sliced a few thicker slices, about 1/4 inch, and then cut about 3/4 of the roast in an very thin, almost transparent manner for sandwiches (I might add some good barbecue sauce to them!). To slice it I used my Rapala electric filet knife, I know, I know, it's made for filetting fishes but it worked extremely well for beef as well.

I spent about twelve bucks on my sirloin roast and will probably eat it for a week and be much more satisfied than eating twelve dollars worth of fast food burgers, which would only be about 2 days worth of eating.
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