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Old 02-26-2007, 05:05 PM   #1
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Smoker and smoked turkey question

We just got a smoker the other day. It is horizontal (like a sideways hot water heater) with a chimney. I would like to smoke a turkey, but I would love some advice on techniques and recipes. Do you brine a turkey to smoke it? What temp and how long per pound for a turkey? I have been reading alot of posts, but I would still appreciate any further help you can give me.

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Old 02-26-2007, 05:11 PM   #2
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Carolelaine, maybe this Smoking Turkey? will help you out some.
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Old 02-26-2007, 05:40 PM   #3
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crewsk, I read the entire thread on your Thanksgiving turkey and it helped. Thank you What temp. did you smoke your turkeys at? How long did you use smoke on them?
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Old 02-26-2007, 06:48 PM   #4
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Good call on starting out with a Smoked Turkey. This last Thanksgiving I smoked 6 Turkey Breasts.

I brined each of them for about 12 hours and then smoked them until they got to an acceptable temperature. I think it's 170 degrees..

Enjoy, and let us all know how it turns out!

-Brad
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Old 02-27-2007, 06:03 AM   #5
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Smoke it at 250-300*. I use smoke for about 2 batches of soaked wood for poultry. I find that to be plenty.
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Old 02-27-2007, 09:35 AM   #6
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I would brine for 24 hours and then smoke at 225-250. To be safe, it needs to reach 165 internally. Something to keep in mind is that, if you are smoking at a constant (as opposed to steadily decreasing) temperature, the turkey will rise a few degrees after you remove it from the smoker. Let it rest for about 15 minutes before carving.

At 230, it should take approximately 30 minutes per pound. A smaller turkey (12-16) is better for this. With something larger, it obviously takes longer, so you run a higher risk of contamination.

I recommend a mild wood like pecan, cherry, or maple. Hickory is great, but just remember to back of a little so you don't overdo it. Hope this helps.
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Old 02-27-2007, 03:45 PM   #7
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This is going to be the dumbest question you guys have ever seen, but I really don't know. If you don't have a temperature gage with your smoker, can you buy on to use with it. I looked at the hardware store today, but didn't find anything. Do you smoke the meat at the end of cooking or the beginning. I got hickory wood chunks, how much is backing off? Thanks
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Old 02-27-2007, 04:20 PM   #8
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Not a dumb question at all. There are plenty of places to buy temperature gauges. I bought mine at Wal-Mart, though their outdoor cooking supplies may be harder to find this time of year. Most sporting/outdoor stores such as Academy or Cabela's should carry these. Or just go to Google and type "smoker temperature gauge" and this will give you plenty of options.

As far as your question of when to smoke question, I always smoke at the beginning. As far how much smoke, that's a great question. Last time, I used 3 chunks of pecan and 1 chunk of hickory and was very happy with the results. It was adequately smoky, but not overdone. If I were only using hickory, I would probably use 3 chunks. Of course, a lot of this is a matter of personal taste. Somebody may have mentioned this before, but a cheap and smaller scale way to test this would be with a whole chicken. Try a certain amount and then adjust according to personal taste.

I'm speaking from personal experience. But I'm sure there somebody who can better address the question of how much smoke. Hope this helps!
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Old 02-27-2007, 05:15 PM   #9
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Thank you sirsmokesalot! I may just try a chicken or two. I was going to do the turkey because he's in my freezer and I need to do something with him. Since I am a total novice at this, a chicken testing could be a good way to start. If this works, I am dying to do a Boston Butt.
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Old 02-27-2007, 05:23 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirsmokesalot
I would brine for 24 hours
boy, that seems like a long time to me. doesn't it get mushy?
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