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Old 04-02-2013, 10:08 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
The part where you said it would be close and frying would finish the job threw me.
I could have been clearer. I intended that if it was close, you could keep it on the smoker a bit longer until it reached the minimum safe temp then frying would be the last step in preparing the dish.

I should reread stuff for clarity before I post.
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Old 04-03-2013, 06:58 AM   #12
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It was probably on the edge of my mind waiting to fall onto the keyboard because the topic has been brought up before. I may have read it to literally.

But at any rate, keep us updated, Rock.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:22 PM   #13
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Are you trying to make uncured bacon?
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:07 PM   #14
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Are you trying to make uncured bacon?
I guess so. I'm not really shooting for bacon. Just smoked pork belly, that I can use for other recipes. I realize it's fresh and I can't let it sit around for long after the smoking process. Just experimenting.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:38 PM   #15
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Smoked pork belly without a curing agent, sliced thin, kinda sounds like uncured bacon.

That said, my sausage book suggest running the smokehouse about 135F until the surface is dry and then lowering the temp until you reach 128F internal.

I like hickory myself.

The downside of no cure is if it takes too long in the smoker at those temps you could be promoting bad bad things, but I don't suspect you will have this sitting for 10 hours or something like that.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:43 PM   #16
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Smoked pork belly without a curing agent, sliced thin, kinda sounds like uncured bacon.

That said, my sausage book suggest running the smokehouse about 135F until the surface is dry and then lowering the temp until you reach 128F internal.

I like hickory myself.

The downside of no cure is if it takes too long in the smoker at those temps you could be promoting bad bad things, but I don't suspect you will have this sitting for 10 hours or something like that.
This is one thing I was concerned about initially. It is pretty thin, so I plan on smoking it for a couple of hours with a spicy, salty rub. Then, directly in the fridge to chill. Then cooking it well when I go to use it.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:47 PM   #17
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A couple hours shouldn't be too bad. And really, I think people can be a bit overzealous about some things when it comes to food. Besides, smoking food was a way to preserve it.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:50 PM   #18
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I am going to throw it on my boss's smoker. He runs it very hot so I will probably end up cooking it. Then I will be using smoked/cooked pork belly.
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Old 04-04-2013, 07:15 AM   #19
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A couple hours shouldn't be too bad. And really, I think people can be a bit overzealous about some things when it comes to food. Besides, smoking food was a way to preserve it.
that's what i thought. smoking is a preservative.

can bad stuff live (or breathe as it were ) in smoke?
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Old 04-04-2013, 08:54 AM   #20
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The reason sodium nitrates and nitrites are added to meats like ham, bacon, and sausages was to inhibit the growth of the organism that creates botulism toxin. It thrives in an anaerobic environment, but is destroyed by heat. if the temperature is above 40', but below 140, and is a low or no-oxygen kind of place, then the organism can thrive, and release its deadly toxins into your food. But it also needs moisture.

That's why canned goods are heated under pressure, to reach higher temperatures that will destroy the critter before the can, or jar is sealed. The same is true with meats, including smoked bacon. The pink salt makes the environment inhospitable for the little nasty critter, as does an acidic environment.

Ever notice the pink color of bologna, mortadella, most dried-cured sausages, that's caused by the the sodium nitrates, and nitrites in the meat. Without them, smoked or unsmoked, they could not be dry-cured. They would have to be cooked.

You could salt-cure your pork belly before smoking it, but then you would have smoked salt pork, and that would be a whole different thing.

There should be some good guidelines on line, like this one: Maple-Bourbon Smoked Pork Belly | she cooks...he cleans

All of the recipes I looked at say to smoke or cook the meat at temperatures between 220 to 240 degrees, for 2 to 4 hours. There are a bunch of online recipes. Just google "smoked pork bellies".

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Hope this helps.
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