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Old 05-16-2011, 11:46 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Nice even slices. Did you make use of the drippings?
Well, that drip foil pan had some dried up drippings from the previous night's chicken cook, so no, I did not use anything from that foil pan if that's what you're talking about.
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Old 05-16-2011, 12:24 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
That looks really good! Sadly, we cannot find the tri-tip cut here.
Do you have a Wegman's up your way? They are the only store or butcher shop that I've seen this cut in around me. I'm going to start making an effort to shop there just because they've got a fantastic selection compared to the local chain, Giant Eagle.
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Old 05-16-2011, 12:38 PM   #13
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Appears to be an interesting cage arrangement for containing charcoal.
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Old 05-16-2011, 12:44 PM   #14
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Do you have a Wegman's up your way?...

I just looked. There are a couple in MA. None within an hour of here. There's no knowing if they cut tri-tips in MA as there would be little demand due to a lack of familiarity.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:00 PM   #15
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Appears to be an interesting cage arrangement for containing charcoal.
Thanks, I fabricated the cage out of 1/2" expanded metal. It holds almost a full chimney worth of briquettes and also makes it easy to salvage partially spent charcoal by sifting the cage for a few seconds before your next cook.

Second photo shows snuffed out coals from the night before and the third photo shows the same left over coals after shaking out all the ash. I just dump freshly lit charcoal over this for the next cook. There's still plenty of juice left in them coals for another run.

That's another feature of the Weber is that after you're done cooking you can snuff out the coals by shutting all the vents.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:20 PM   #16
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That's one perfect Tri Tip, roadfix!! It's my favorite barbecue !! It's sad that even after all of these years, this cut of meat isn't available to the rest of the world. I remember well when they first came on the scene locally in Santa Maria, not far from here.
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That looks really good! Sadly, we cannot find the tri-tip cut here.
Speaking of regional food history on another thread, this is a great little article on our claim to fame.

The History of Tri Tip
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:21 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Thanks, I fabricated the cage out of 1/2" expanded metal. It holds almost a full chimney worth of briquettes and also makes it easy to salvage partially spent charcoal by sifting the cage for a few seconds before your next cook.

Second photo shows snuffed out coals from the night before and the third photo shows the same left over coals after shaking out all the ash. I just dump freshly lit charcoal over this for the next cook. There's still plenty of juice left in them coals for another run.

That's another feature of the Weber is that after you're done cooking you can snuff out the coals by shutting all the vents.

That looks like it holds more charcoal than the ones Weber sells.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:36 PM   #18
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That looks like it holds more charcoal than the ones Weber sells.
It most definitely does. I can go 5+ hours low and slow with that setup without having to add more charcoal.
I think the Weber cages hold just a handful of briquettes each but certainly enough for most average length cooks.
Most people just use bricks to hold back the coals.

I also like using a single strip of expanded metal to bank and hold the coals. They all work well.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:44 PM   #19
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I remember well when they first came on the scene locally in Santa Maria, not far from here.


Speaking of regional food history on another thread, this is a great little article on our claim to fame.

The History of Tri Tip
Thanks! On the Solvang bike rides that we do tri-tip is always served at the finish, grilled over red oak on authentic Santa Maria grills.....
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:38 PM   #20
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Thank's for the cage photos.
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