"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > BBQ & Smokin' Meats
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-16-2007, 09:27 PM   #41
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: East Lansing, MI
Posts: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by swinchen
... so there is not much room between the ash catch pan and the charcoal grate. I think that this is cutting off airflow to the coals. Maybe next time I will try turning it over to life the coals up a little higher. *sigh* this is not a great first experience....


thanks,
Sam
I posted a solution to this very problem recently. Read about it here.
__________________

__________________
Crash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2007, 10:20 PM   #42
Cook
 
swinchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 98
Send a message via AIM to swinchen Send a message via Skype™ to swinchen
Thanks Crash! I thought I was going crazy :)
__________________

__________________
swinchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2007, 10:23 PM   #43
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
bwwaaahahaha!

You got the same mess as ME!

bwaaaaaahahahaha.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2007, 10:29 PM   #44
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Sam? Where are you? Get away from the oven! It won't reach 200 with you staring at it.


.....well, I gotta hit the sack. I expect a full report by morning! :)

Hope you got to eat yours!
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2007, 08:21 PM   #45
Cook
 
swinchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 98
Send a message via AIM to swinchen Send a message via Skype™ to swinchen
So, I finished last night around midnight. It was still only up to 190 when I pulled it, and the meat was a bit on the tough side. While I was waiting for it to cool I made up three sauces... a sweet, thick, smoky sauce. A mustard sauce and a vinegar sauce. To be honest I have never ever had pulled pork before, so I have no idea how to compare it. It tastes very much like a ham... like a boiled, shredded ham. Anyways, I only shredded one butt... but I took it with me to my girlfriends camp today. Her mother took the rest home with her, so I guess it was alright! I am so critical of my cooking though, and I hardly ever enjoy eating it as much as I enjoy cooking it :/ such is the way of life.

Ok, here is one of two my butts after being pulled. I put a few common items around it for size comparison. The Visine is for my eyes. All red from the smoke. Plus it brought a tear to my eye when I tried it. It is so good. Next time I will do a rub though, and cook it a little longer. Pulling it was a little tough.



From a different angle...


Well next time I will:
#1) Avoid Kingsford like the plague, or modify my grill. It was a nightmare throughout the grilling process. Lump seemed a lot more manageable, plus there is no need to start each load in the chimney! I am still a little confused about different types of fuel, but that is a question for another post.

#2) Apply a rub the night before. It was very tasty and I am glad I did it this way first just to see what the base flavor was. But it tastes like ham... I want it to taste more southern. Maybe this also means using a wood other than hickory... oak? mesquite?

#3) More smoke... the smoke flavor wasn't terribly pronounced. I think I could have gone quite a bit further without making it bitter.

#4) Cook it to a higher temperature to make the pulling process slightly easier.


Well it was far from a disaster and I just had a pulled pork burrito for dinner. It was GOOD. I can't wait for my next adventure!


Thank you all so much for the help, I would have freaked out without your support.

Sam.
__________________
swinchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2007, 08:35 PM   #46
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Well, Sam, my hat's off to you. For a first try, you did a good job. Yes, I recommend a rub for your next excursion. As for the wood, in my experience with stovetop smoking, I usually use a bit (not a whole lot) of hickory. It imparts a wonderful flavor, but it can be very strong.

You'll be an expert in no time at all. Your best qualities are patience and perseverance.

Long live slow-cooked meats!!!!
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2007, 08:53 PM   #47
Cook
 
swinchen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Maine
Posts: 98
Send a message via AIM to swinchen Send a message via Skype™ to swinchen
I am not sure who Frank is, but if you are talking to me... Thanks :)

Sam
__________________
swinchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2007, 09:02 PM   #48
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
My bad...I had a brain hiccup. Yes, you, Sam. Good job.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2007, 08:56 AM   #49
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Sam,

As far as color, mine looked the same as your's. The texture of mine was pretty stringy, (my technical term). I mixed some of it with my BBQ sauce and threw it on a Kaiser bun.

Like Katie said, try mesquite for some more smoke flavor. I only used a couple handfulls and had a nice smokey flavor on the bark.

When I cut into mine, the bone fell right out and I used two forks to pull the meat.

Next time...I'll start it on the smoker for flavor, then finish it up in the oven.
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2007, 09:08 AM   #50
Executive Chef
 
AllenOK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA, Oklahoma
Posts: 3,463
Swinchen, Jeekinz, you are now initiated into the wonderful addiction that is smoking.

Swinchen, I see pink on that meat. That's a good sign! The "pink ring" as it's called is a natural reaction between the nitrates/nitrites in smoke, and the protein in meat.

Yes, do a dry rub the night before, and let the meat sit in your refrigerator uncovered so the rub gets kind of "tacky". This helps the smoke adhere to the meat.

Here's a trick I used to do back when I was a kid in the Boy Scouts. Go get a cheap pair of swim goggles or face mask. Wear those when you're working with the fire, or going to be in the smoke for awhile. It'll save your eyes a lot of suffering. Of course, you're neighbors, and probably family, will think you've lost it.

As I've stated before, I'm a "log burner". I only use charcoal to get the fire started. After that, wood, and wood only. I have on hand, some pecan, oak, a little hickory, and some ash. I usually smoke meat with a mix of oak and hickory, however, I bought a little pecan to try it, and it's working pretty good, so I may just go with oak and pecan from here out. Both are plentiful here in OK.

I've got some turkey legs brining right now, and I'm about to pull them out, dry them off, and rub 'em down in preparation to smoke later today. I'll post a pictoral about it.
__________________

__________________
Peace, Love, and Vegetable Rights!
Eat Meat and Save the Plants!
AllenOK is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.