"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > BBQ & Smokin' Meats
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-02-2013, 10:02 AM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,764
afternoon easter?

i hate it when my phone decides to add or modify words.

also, i meant if your ph is too high, you can lower it with ash.

and just to continue what jpb said, don't use ash from briquettes unless you know that it has no chemical additives and hasn't been started with lighter fluid.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 10:13 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
A higher the PH is less acidic (more alkaline).
Lemonade = ~ 2.5
Calcium Carbonate = ~ 9
__________________

__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 10:25 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I sell them to the local Catholic diocese shortly before Easter. On a Tuesday night if I remember correctly.


They hit the burn pit. Ashes to ashes as they say.
I was told as a kid that the church burns the palms left over from Palm Sunday for next years' Ash Wednesday.

As a kid everyone that had a wood burning stove, used the ashes on the sidewalk to keep folks from slipping and falling. That was before it was law that you had to shovel your walk.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 11:52 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
You know, Addie, I was just thinking the same thing. That they must burn the previous year's leftover palms. I'm sure it just isn't any old ash. Not sure if they bless it or not. I was raised catholic, but don't recall ever going to church on Ash Wed or asking where they got the ashes.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 01:32 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Charcoal briquettes have waxes and other ingredients in them that cause them to lite easier, burn longer, etc. These other ingredients are not good for plants, and can kill them.

natural lump charcoal ass is ok to add to your garden. It will reduce the acidity of your soil, or raise the PH. If you are growing acid loving plants, don't put ash in the soil they are going to be planted in. Check with your local nursery, or on line for information on specific plants.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 08:58 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
You know, Addie, I was just thinking the same thing. That they must burn the previous year's leftover palms. I'm sure it just isn't any old ash. Not sure if they bless it or not. I was raised catholic, but don't recall ever going to church on Ash Wed or asking where they got the ashes.
I am not Catholic but was raised in an Italian town. So I just always knew. Once something has been blessed, you can't just throw it away without having a priest remove the blessing.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 08:06 AM   #17
Sous Chef
 
Paymaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ephesus Georgia
Posts: 530
I collect and add my my wood ashes to our garden every spring. It seems to be good for the garden. We have plenty of tasty veggies come out of it every year.
__________________
"Of all the things I have lost in my life,I miss my mind the most".
David
Paymaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2013, 09:34 AM   #18
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paymaster View Post
I collect and add my my wood ashes to our garden every spring. It seems to be good for the garden. We have plenty of tasty veggies come out of it every year.
Wood ash - good.
Charcoal briquette ash - no good.

One of the best places to find great, wild blueberries, or morel mushrooms, in the wild, is to go to where there was a fire. The wood ash adds a great many nutrients back into the soil, making is especially fertile for new growth.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 01:40 PM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
ElectroEvolution's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3
After cooking, most, if not all, drippings are evaporated/incinerated. Most ashes are always good for any type of gardens. I always throw all my ashes in my grass or garden. Tomatoes especially love them
__________________
ElectroEvolution is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2013, 01:45 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,059
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElectroEvolution View Post
After cooking, most, if not all, drippings are evaporated/incinerated. Most ashes are always good for any type of gardens. I always throw all my ashes in my grass or garden. Tomatoes especially love them
When I was a kid, the ashes from the stove or furnace were thrown on the sidewalk in the winter to prevent slipping on the ice. Didn't have to shovel back then. The snow was packed down for sleds to glide over. That is how you got your groceries home from the store. On a sled. Or sat the baby on instead of a carriage.
__________________

__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.