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Old 10-28-2015, 01:09 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
It takes a little muscle power to drive those blades into the meat. But you're right, I think it needs at least 2 passes throughout, both sides, to really make a difference.

Next week I'll try this tool on a piece of flat iron steak, one of my favorite cuts.
The way I do it is to make a complete pass in one direction, rotate 90 degrees and go across again, then do the same on the opposite side.
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Old 10-28-2015, 01:29 PM   #42
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My tool looks like this. I can apply a fair amount of downward force with it. I just pound away covering the surface several times then turn the meat over and repeat. I use it mostly on flank steak.
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Old 10-28-2015, 01:32 PM   #43
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^^^ I like that design with the handle. You can 'stab' the meat with some force.
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Old 10-28-2015, 02:01 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
It takes a little muscle power to drive those blades into the meat. But you're right, I think it needs at least 2 passes throughout, both sides, to really make a difference.

Next week I'll try this tool on a piece of flat iron steak, one of my favorite cuts.
I'm glad to hear that about flat iron steak RF as I've never done one. I wanted a flank steak but were told this Von's doesn't even stock them.
In the old days, they were quite inexpensive but even in Costco the price of them now is mind boggling.
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Old 10-28-2015, 02:04 PM   #45
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I buy flank steak at Costco as that's the best price. It comes in a two-pack. I cut one up for pepper steaks and freeze them. I either grill or stuff the other.
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Old 10-28-2015, 04:42 PM   #46
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My tool looks like this. I can apply a fair amount of downward force with it. I just pound away covering the surface several times then turn the meat over and repeat. I use it mostly on flank steak.
The Jaccard type has 48 flat blades, rather than round needles, with a sharpened, angled tip, so they cut like 48 small knives. I find it does a better job of cutting through tough connective tissue, which is after all what the tool is designed to do. You can see the blades in this photo:

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Old 10-28-2015, 05:57 PM   #47
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The Jaccard type has 48 flat blades, rather than round needles, with a sharpened, angled tip, so they cut like 48 small knives. I find it does a better job of cutting through tough connective tissue, which is after all what the tool is designed to do. You can see the blades in this photo:


You could be tight, Rick. However, my cheapo tenderizer seems to do the job the few times a year I use it.
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Old 10-30-2015, 02:02 PM   #48
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Since I do much more open grilling than smoking, I'd like to one day install a Santa Maria style grill. I've looked at a few over the past several years from self-installed drop-in kits to fully assembled stand alone units. Lot of them are good, but I've also seen some junk out there too.
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Old 10-30-2015, 03:25 PM   #49
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Hi Ross.
Beautiful process, but it must be cooked in the oven at a temperature so hot? (325)? It is not too high? Thanks
Thanks Mario, 325* in the oven would be right just keep track of the interior temp.

Ross
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Old 10-30-2015, 03:53 PM   #50
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Thanks Mario, 325* in the oven would be right just keep track of the interior temp.

Ross
I personally don't think 325 is hot enough. I do mine in the oven at 425 degrees to get a nice crust on it. An average size is generally done to 125 degrees in 30 minutes in the oven.
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