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Old 08-10-2006, 10:43 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
I just got some more Alberta Beef pix...want I should share? Good to see you here my friend, I've been missing you!
you had to ask????
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Old 08-13-2006, 08:43 PM   #32
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Having just returned from 3 weeks in Italy, of which 8 days were spent in exploring Tuscany and Chianti, I have to chime in on this discussion. I had some of the best beef I've ever eaten, and I didn't even have what the region is famous for... Bistecca alla Fiorentina. The cattle are Chianina (pronounced ka-nee-na), they are pure white and they are huge, and there many breeds in the US that have been crossed at some point with Chianina. And the porterhouse cuts that are used in the above dish are also much larger than we are used to (which is why I never got to try it... my wife and I together could never have eaten one). I had sirloin twice and a filet once and all were incredible.

See this site for some info on these cattle. http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/cattle/chianina/

As far as eating beef locally, we have bought our beef for several years on the hoof from a farming friend who raises about 25 head of herefords a year just for sale locally. He buys weaned calves at auction, runs them on the range and feeds them his own mix till the next February, then sends them to the packer as yearlings. They are raised with no steroids, and no antibiotics unless actually needed. His customers (me in this case) give their custom cutting instructions to the packer, and pick up the beef cut, packaged, and quick frozen. This is hands down the best beef I've ever eaten on this side of the Atlantic, and that includes going to some ridiculously overpriced, ritzy steakhouses.
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Old 03-13-2007, 07:41 PM   #33
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I'm still lovin' angus here....

because, on sale at $7.99 a lb., it's hard to beat. Last week we had a shoulder roast cooked as a pot roast and I told my wife that if we could have it this good everytime, I'd take this in place of turkey and dressing on Thanksgiving. That was the best roast I ever ate. I give my wife all the credit on that one. After my original post of "superior" beef, what I really meant to say is that the angus beef, in my neck of the woods, is superior to "supermarket" beef. From ground beef to rib-eyes, I really enjoy it. The real joy is I get to grill year round here in Texas.
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Old 03-14-2007, 06:45 PM   #34
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Gretchen,I agree totally! No marinade on a good steak or maybe just a little worchestershire before cooking.
I know some people who buy the most expensive cuts of meat and I mean expensive and then totally destroy the meat with a whole bunch of beef rub seasoning followed by a whole bunch of dry herbs and then soaked in a ton of worchestershire OVERNIGHT no less, by the time its cooked it tastes nothing like the meat but just of seasonings.Bleech.I cant convince them other wise.
I believe people tend to over marinade most meats any way, its supposed to enhance the meat not turn it it into a ,a a, I dont know what.
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Old 03-15-2007, 08:37 PM   #35
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And....

Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmcgrew
Gretchen,I agree totally! No marinade on a good steak or maybe just a little worchestershire before cooking.
I know some people who buy the most expensive cuts of meat and I mean expensive and then totally destroy the meat with a whole bunch of beef rub seasoning followed by a whole bunch of dry herbs and then soaked in a ton of worchestershire OVERNIGHT no less, by the time its cooked it tastes nothing like the meat but just of seasonings.Bleech.I cant convince them other wise.
I believe people tend to over marinade most meats any way, its supposed to enhance the meat not turn it it into a ,a a, I dont know what.
Thanks for not mentioning "Ketchup".
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Old 03-15-2007, 08:42 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Phil
Thanks for not mentioning "Ketchup".
Pure sacrilege!! Ketchup!

Buck and I enjoy a beautiful piece of beef with no additives except some garlic salt...after it's come off the grill. This way we can enjoy the full flavor of the meat.

I might also add that we like ours with the "moo" slapped out of it and the center nicely pink.
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Old 03-15-2007, 09:10 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E
Pure sacrilege!! Ketchup!

Buck and I enjoy a beautiful piece of beef with no additives except some garlic salt...after it's come off the grill. This way we can enjoy the full flavor of the meat.

I might also add that we like ours with the "moo" slapped out of it and the center nicely pink.
Agreed! Anyone that adds ketchup OR cooks/orders well done a beautiful piece of beef should be shot on site!
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Old 03-15-2007, 09:15 PM   #38
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Sadly, Mr. P, my mother cooked steaks until they could be used to shingle a roof. I don't know how my father stood it because he liked his barely warmed up. I guess that's why he always ordered steak when we went out for dinner.
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Old 03-15-2007, 09:30 PM   #39
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Ketchup?Ketchup? I love ketchup but only for certain things.Oh my goodness what better way to ruin a good piece of prime beef.,steak etc.Ketchup is pretty good on a burger but is much better on french fries.
Did you know that the germans like to eat their fries with mayonaise ?
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Old 03-15-2007, 09:43 PM   #40
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Yes over cooking is so,so bad why do some people just not get it?I worked at a a place when someone would keep sending back a piece of meat over and over because they wanted it more done,we would just finally put it in the microwave and really kill it and then they were happy.SHOE LEATHER!
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