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Old 03-15-2007, 10:14 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve A
As a chef, a griller and a former meat cutter I'll weigh in on this discussion.

The breed of animal is less important than other items. Diet and exercise are HUGE indicators of the muscle's flavor and texture. Want to experiment? Put a Holstein, Angus and, perhaps, a Charlais, in same the conditions and on the same feed. IF you can tell the difference, I'd be grately surprised.

Ciao,
From personal experience, I concure with Steve. Better flavor is the result of good feed, be it high quality grass, or good corn finishing. Add to this a reasonable amount of exersice to "beef-up" the beef, bbut not so much as to make the muscles tough and too lean. In addition, the extra blood flow to the muscles gives them more flavor.

I have heard the benefits of Black Angus ever since I lived in San Diego where they had Black Angus restaurants. The breed produces a very meaty animal. But so does a Charlais. And as for the Kobe, it is exclusivity that drives the price to such an exhorbitant sum. For the beef to be Kobe, it must come from the Kobe valley at the base of Mount Fuji in Japan.

American Wagyu beef is of the same breed, but has been grown in the U.S. and therefore cannot be called Kobe. It's like calling a sparkling wine Campaigne when it was actually produced in Nappa Valley. It is against the commonly accepted rules of etiquette, and indeed, is protected against by various organizations. I have not personally had the opportunity to eat Wagyu, but would love to one day.

I guess this whole thing is like trying to say that speckled trout taste better than do rainbow trout. I do know my trout. And I can testify that both species, when taken from the same stream, and of equal size, once cooked, are equal in flavor, texture, and even flesh color. But the quality of the one speckled trout versus another can vary dramatically depending on the waters from which it is caught, and by how it came into the world. Wild trout are far superior in quality to their planted brothers and sisters.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-15-2007, 11:23 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by jpmcgrew
Ketchup?Ketchup? I love ketchup but only for certain things.Oh my goodness what better way to ruin a good piece of prime beef.,steak etc.Ketchup is pretty good on a burger but is much better on french fries.
Did you know that the germans like to eat their fries with mayonaise ?
Mayo is great on fries! Really it is.
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Old 03-16-2007, 06:28 AM   #43
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I like mayo on FF also.
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Old 03-16-2007, 09:17 AM   #44
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Sad...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. P
Agreed! Anyone that adds ketchup OR cooks/orders well done a beautiful piece of beef should be shot on site!
I'd be eating with a dead wife She is a texture freak and likes her beef almost burned. She could be just as happy, if not more so, with a ground angus beef patty as with the rib-eye. She hates the texture of mushrooms and will actually become sick if confronted with liver. However......
I have learned to appreciate the charcoal grill from a friend with trial and error. Gas grilling is easier and is more of a consistant heat source, but the Webber grill has produced some of the finest char-broiled beef I've ever eaten. The Webbers' design, and the fact you can produce a very hot bed of coals, (and wood), at 500 +, allows me to cook an inch thick steak, with a hot pick center and, the most important, no blood in the plate. I care not about the scientific principles involved in the process, just the fact that I can predict the outcome of a steak using this method. It's heaven on earth when this happens.
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Old 03-16-2007, 07:50 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil
I've grilled too many steaks not to be totally convinced that angus beef is superior. At least here in Texas. I simply couldn't be more pleased with the last four rib-eyes I've grilled, unless they were free. Every bite is, wow! They have more flavor and are far more tender than anything else I've bought. They are higher priced, but I don't care. On sale in the Dallas area, they are $7 a pound. And if you're new to grillin' steaks, buy your steaks at least an inch thick. If you marinade, you needn't do so longer than one hour. Get your grill 425, or upwards and sear, covered, each side one minute, then continue cooking. Turn with tongs, don't pierce the steak. A medium rare steak, at one inch thick, should take about 7-8 minutes. I can cook a steak with a red center with no blood on the plate. And the real secret? Let the steaks rest for five minutes before serving. Salt 'n pepper 'n eat. It doesn't get better for me. Happy grillin'
Phil


Yes, angus beef IS much more superior and it tastes better too and is much more tender as well.

Some supermarkets call it BLACK angus beef too.
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:33 PM   #46
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Are brown eggs better than white ones?
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:35 PM   #47
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Quote:
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Are brown eggs better than white ones?
Not really. The only difference, genetically, is that brown eggs come from a different kind of chicken.
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:44 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Katie E
Not really. The only difference, genetically, is that brown eggs come from a different kind of chicken.
By differnet kind...You do mean breed I think.

Then, can I safely assume that meat that comes from a black steer taste no different than meat from a red one? Or a brown one? Or a white one?
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:46 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
Are brown eggs better than white ones?
Brown eggs are local eggs and local eggs are fresh. (The Bostonians will get this reference).
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:49 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob
By differnet kind...You do mean breed I think.

Then, can I safely assume that meat that comes from a black steer taste no different than meat from a red one? Or a brown one? Or a white one?
Yes, you are correct. Chickens that are white and who have white lobes, produce white eggs. Brown chickens with brown lobes produce brown eggs.
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