"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Outdoor Cooking Forum > Cooking on the Grill
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-04-2012, 02:42 PM   #31
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,873
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Good thing it's a roast then! If sophistication means being a snob about something, I'll just stick to the down to earth. BTW, IMO, since the introduction of the micro-plane, the garlic press should take the road of the dinos.
I think a garlic press is quicker and offers less risk of fingers getting grated.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 02:50 PM   #32
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,343
You usually hear of a tri-tip's being cooked in the London Broil style. Marinate and grill to no more than medium and slice thinly across the grain. Not sure if you want to call that a roast or a steak.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 03:08 PM   #33
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Addie, it's highly unlikely that the unsuitable Tri Tip is used for steaks in other parts of the country. It's much more likely to be used in ground sirloin, as my meat cutter father did many years ago here in California, before the "Tri Tip revelation" of the early '60's, or late '50's.
This is probably why the cut isn't available most places. Hadn't heard of it for well over 20 years when we went to California 13 years ago, and there, as when I was a kid, we had it just about everywhere we went.

My preferred marinade is a teriyaki type one; soy, an acid of some kind (vinegar, citrus), some sugar, garlic, onion, ginger. But when I was young my parents and their friends were more into the dry rub thing. Mom used garlic, onion, and celery salts and lots of ground black pepper. But one thing that bears repitition, this is a cut that does not take to being well done over the coals. If you have to have your meat grey, then braise them.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 04:49 PM   #34
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,017
I guess I am spoiled. I have a butcher that gives me anything I ask for. And then we have the Hilltop House up on Route One. They sell almost a million pounds of beef each month. Their meat shop is huge and they do a gold mine operation. Their prices are reasonable and lower than supermarkets. On Fridays and Saturdays they have lines out the door. Son #2 travels up Route One often during the week and will stop in to pick up a piece of meat that is on sale. He will be going there tomorrow to see if they have Porterhouse Steaks out. They didn't yesterday. It is my one treat for myself. It will cost no more the $5.99 per pound. In the supermarket it is $9.99.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 05:01 PM   #35
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I guess I am spoiled. I have a butcher that gives me anything I ask for. And then we have the Hilltop House up on Route One. They sell almost a million pounds of beef each month. Their meat shop is huge and they do a gold mine operation. Their prices are reasonable and lower than supermarkets. On Fridays and Saturdays they have lines out the door. Son #2 travels up Route One often during the week and will stop in to pick up a piece of meat that is on sale. He will be going there tomorrow to see if they have Porterhouse Steaks out. They didn't yesterday. It is my one treat for myself. It will cost no more the $5.99 per pound. In the supermarket it is $9.99.
If that's the case Addie, you should ask them to get you a Tri Tip, unless their supplier has has already ground it up for ground sirloin.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 07:19 AM   #36
Head Chef
 
tinlizzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,003
My tri-tip roast turned out very well. Marinated, roasted at 425F to 135 degrees, rested, sliced against the grain. Very tasty, and enough for several meals for me -- I'm looking forward to a roast beef with horseradish sauce sammie.

I'm glad I wasn't drummed out of the corps for admitting that I don't have a grill, here on a grilling thread. It was that south Florida mention that drew me in.

I don't have a garlic press, either.
__________________
No matter how simple it seems, it's complicated.
tinlizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 07:22 AM   #37
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,777
Tonight the tri-tip hits the grill, if the weather cooperates.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 12:55 PM   #38
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
My tri-tip roast turned out very well. Marinated, roasted at 425F to 135 degrees, rested, sliced against the grain. Very tasty, and enough for several meals for me -- I'm looking forward to a roast beef with horseradish sauce sammie.

I'm glad I wasn't drummed out of the corps for admitting that I don't have a grill, here on a grilling thread. It was that south Florida mention that drew me in.

I don't have a garlic press, either.
Thanks for the report!
Lizzie, I have a grill but often do my tri tips in the oven, and they turn out great! I'm really sorry you had to pay such an outrageous price, as they are on sale here today at $2.97 lb. I'm glad you used very high heat, as anything under 400 degrees just won't give the browning one wants as I want mine rare.
My very favorite way to cook them is the way Dawg mentioned..in my stove/grill top smoker and finished on the open grill.
You're right, the leftovers are wonderful. I sometimes use the slices for steak and eggs the next morning. Yumm!!
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 02:15 PM   #39
Head Chef
 
tinlizzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Thanks for the report!

You're right, the leftovers are wonderful. I sometimes use the slices for steak and eggs the next morning. Yumm!!

Ooooo. Steak and eggs, YES!

One question: I froze single portions and wonder how to reheat them without turning them into shoe leather. I'd love to keep that lovely pink tenderness if possible.
__________________
No matter how simple it seems, it's complicated.
tinlizzie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 02:44 PM   #40
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlizzie View Post
Ooooo. Steak and eggs, YES!

One question: I froze single portions and wonder how to reheat them without turning them into shoe leather. I'd love to keep that lovely pink tenderness if possible.
With the exception of steak and eggs, I don't like to reheat it for the reason you mentioned. In addition to fabulous sandwiches (with some heated barbeque sauce) on toasted buns or sourdough, the cold slices are great for a "one dish salad meal", or diced up on top of a loaded baked potato for a complete meal.
__________________

__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
florida

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.