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Old 03-31-2008, 06:30 AM   #71
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Did this Sirloin Sat night. I rubbed it with olive oil and sprinkled a generous amount of kosher salt, garlic salt and ground black pepper then let it sit at room temperature for one hour. I get the Weber as hot as possible then throw a couple of pieces of thick sliced bacon on with the steak. About three minutes a side then inside to rest for five minutes.


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Old 05-21-2008, 11:22 AM   #72
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Nice looking steak John but, for my taste the outside isn't seared, burnt, crispy, however you want to call it, enough. I love a nice medium rear steak thats nice and charcoaled on the outside almost Pittsburg style. Thats the challenge for me when grilling trying to get that nice burnt outside but not over cooking the middle.

Oh and hello to everyone. Newbie from Massachusetts here. Resident BBQ/grilling weekend warrier/hacker.
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Old 05-21-2008, 12:34 PM   #73
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For me, the steak looks perfect. Since I too have a Weber Kettle grill/BBQ, I know just what flavor you achieved. Yummy!. For an added treat, while gilling the steaks, drizzle some EVOO on portabella mushroom caps, gill side, and grill them alongside the steaks.

Another trick is to grill them with the lid on. This causes more smoke particle deposition on the meat, giving it a smokier flavor.

But again, your steaks look perfect to me.

And for you Quint, the only way I know to get that blackened outside without overcooking the inside is to put extra fat on the fire, litterally. As it drips and flares, the very hot flames will char the outside fast.

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Old 05-21-2008, 12:46 PM   #74
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Another way to do it Goodweed and Quint, is to start with a very cold steak. Normally we let steak come to room temp before grilling, but if you want a dark outside and a rare inside then get your fire real hot and put a cold steak on the grill. You could even partially freeze the steak first.
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Old 05-21-2008, 12:54 PM   #75
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A hot grill and thick steak works the best.

A problem with newer propane grills is most of them have some sort of flame tamer which decreases the browning....or what's properly known as the Maillard Effect.
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Old 05-21-2008, 01:13 PM   #76
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i wonder if maillard used sunscreen very often?

when i caved and bought a propane grill, one of the features that i made sure it had was a searing burner. they are fantastic. i use it for blackening peppers; with shrimp and other small fish or veggies in my grill wok; and anything else that requires a hot, direct flame. i've even been able to make really thin, 1/4" steaks medium rare with decent browning on the surface.

it sorta looks like a rectangular catalytic converter where one of the burner/flame tamers should be, with a blue flame across the entire surface.
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Old 05-21-2008, 01:18 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Another way to do it Goodweed and Quint, is to start with a very cold steak. Normally we let steak come to room temp before grilling, but if you want a dark outside and a rare inside then get your fire real hot and put a cold steak on the grill. You could even partially freeze the steak first.
Bingo! I love a very rare steak with a cold center BUT a nicely browned outer surface.
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Old 05-22-2008, 05:31 PM   #78
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I wonder why I don't have silly, diaganol, dark stripes accross my body, 'cause I get grilled every day by my boss, or his boss, or some other person who knows nothing about what they are supposed to know about.

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Old 05-22-2008, 07:59 PM   #79
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ha ha, so many funny posts about grilling, thank you for that!

Dry aged? You know when I learned something (i actually learned something ) about how the difficulty with grilling meat was the problem of the 'wetness' of the steak.
I watched a show on browning a steak and how the wetness had to be dealt with before it would brown, or show grill marks. So the 'dry aged' thing, will be an advantage prior to pan frying/grilling.
With a venison steak (ya, no fat to forgive the poor methods of cooking), put the steaks on a baking pan and DRY the steak at 295°F for 20 minutes until it reaches an internal temperature of 95°F (now you are on a roll, it will keep cooking). During that time you should have the grill on so it's really hot! Then put it on the grill and give it marks (this should be easy because it is dry and will mark easily), a minute here and there. Once it is cooked 2 or 3 millimeters deep and it has nice grill marks, let it sit on a plate (yes it continues to cook!). After 10 minutes the internal temperature reaches 135 to 140°F . Time to serve, a medium rare steak with grill marks, awesome. The venison was really good.
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Old 06-03-2008, 05:34 AM   #80
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Hi. If you're still looking for a fairly foolproof way to make a steak, why don't you give my method a try? I actually combined two methods I came across, and the result is tender flavorful steak.

You will need a probe, one of those polder ones is best. The instant reads are ok, but you got to keep checking. Start off with the best steaks you can, Prime, choice etc. Look for marbling. You mentioned the right cuts, tbones, porters, ribeyes, strips.

First step is to salt your steak, one hour prior to cooking. Yes, one hour. To read more google Jadens Steamy Kitchen Salt Steak. yeah I can't post urls yet.
I actually do not put as much as that blogger does. I salt my steaks good, but only as much as I normally would anyway, I don't put a ton of salt then rinse later. I salt, then wait. What happens is the salt draws out moisture from the steaks. Then the moisture dissolves the salt and then after that, the meat draws back in this salt water. Makes for flavorful and tender meat. So after that hour, if it's dripping wet still, you can pat dry or just apply whatever seasonings you want. Lots of black pepper, maybe a tiny bit of garlic powder etc.

Ok, preheat your oven to 275F or your grill to roughly the same temp (lid closed after you light). Insert your temp probe in the middle of the steak (if your steak has a bone, I find putting it a bit closer to the bone is better than middle). If using an oven, place the steak on a cooling rack over a half cookie sheet, or improvise as best you can. You want it to be open below the steak. If you have a grill, just put it on the grates, over burners that are not on. Let the steaks come up to temp. You say you like medium? 100-105F is what you're looking for. If you like medium rare (please try it!) 90-95F. When the temp is approaching your target, preheat the grill if you're not using it already. You want it to be fairly hot, but not hottest. Medium hot is good (you can use a cast iron skillet here). If you are using the grill for the preheat then you have to take the steak out, tent it with foil, and get the grill hot as fast as you can. You want to be quick. Ok, once the steak hits around 100F, pull the steak (from oven or grill) and transfer to the medium-hot grill. Cook on each side for no more than 2-2.5 minutes each side. I guess since you don't mind more cooked meat, you won't worry too much if it overcooks, and if it undercooks just throw them back on.

You should have something close to medium. You may have to adjust several things after your first shot. And it seems like a complicated process but it's not. It's just a pre-salt, then a reverse sear. Both methods well documented at Cooks Illustrated. The presalt seasons and apparently tenderizes the meat. The preheat before sear does two things, dries out the surface of the meat (good for not wasting heat and improve searing/browning), and finally, the 1/2 hour cook time allows enzymes to work in overdrive to break down the meat. CI called them cathespins I think. It allows for an abbreviated aging process so to speak, in the oven, in 30 minutes. They tested a reverse sear with a regular sear then finish in the oven, and noted the difference greatly. They even recommend taking the steak from the fridge right to the oven, as it allows the enzymes to work longer. I don't always but I have. Oh yeah, your thick steak (get it thick!) will have only a very thin gray section in the steak, none of that thick band of gray we all hate.
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